Traditional recipes

The Ultimate Rosh Hashanah Restaurant Guide Slideshow

The Ultimate Rosh Hashanah Restaurant Guide Slideshow

Zahav — Philadelphia

Zahav has crafted a special menu for the holiday, which includes dishes such as hummus with chanterelles and pine nuts, griddled honey cake with foie gras and apples, and duck three ways. The meal is $48 per person and will be offered from Sept. 16 to 20.

Kutsher’s Tribeca — New York City

Kutsher’s Tribeca will offer a special five-course prix fixe menu Sept. 16 and 17 this year. The highlights include chopped duck and chicken livers with matzo, rye, and pumpernickel; wild halibut gefilte fish; and whole roasted rainbow trout.

Kosher Kingdom — Miami

Miami’s Kosher Kingdom will offer complete dinners for 12 to go. The meal begins with a choice of roasted turkey, roasted chicken, or beef brisket as the main course and also includes gefilte fish, chicken soup with matzo balls, potato kugel, string beans almondine, carrot tzimmes, horseradish, and gravy.

Akasha — Los Angeles

Akasha is offering a Rosh Hashanah dinner Sept. 16 and 17 in addition to their regular menu. The special dishes include chopped chicken liver with challah (as well as a vegetarian "mock chopped liver"), slow-roasted Niman Ranch brisket with potato latkes, and dark chocolate chunk rugelach.

Art’s Deli — Studio City, Calif.

Arthurs Deli is offering Rosh Hashanah meals for dine-in, takeout, and delivery this holiday. Diners can pick and choose from a wide variety of festive dishes, or order the complete meal, which includes such items as chopped liver, matzo ball soup, and brisket with gravy.

Clementine — Los Angeles

Let Clementine cater your Rosh Hashanah meal this year; just be sure to place your order at least 48 hours in advance. The High Holidays menus (for both Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur) will be available Sept. 15 to 26. Highlights include whole-roasted Jidori chicken, honey-glazed carrots, and matzo ball soup.

Joe’s Seafood — Chicago

Well-known seafood and steak restaurant Joe’s is serving up a refreshing holiday menu this year. Notable dishes include homemade gefilte fish with red beet horseradish, wild Alaskan halibut en papillote; and flourless chocolate cake. The prix fixe runs $45.95 per person.

Mon Ami Gabi — Chicago

Why not kick off the New Year with some French fare? Mon Ami Gabi is serving up chopped liver with onion croutons, herb chicken paillard with green beans and potato pancakes, and apple tarte tatin with caramel sauce.

Di Pescara — Chicago

Di Pescara is taking the guesswork out of Rosh Hashanah. Theyre offering a full menu available in the restaurant as well as for takeout. The meal is served family-style and includes traditional and vegetarian chopped liver, roast chicken and peppers, and flourless chocolate cake with cherry compote.

Feast — Tucson, Ariz.

Feast is offering a full feast for takeout this Rosh Hashanah. The meal includes classics like Alaskan halibut and salmon gefilte fish, noodle kugel with raisins and sour cream, and apple bread pudding with honey crme anglaise.

Huckleberry Café — Santa Monica, Calif.

Huckleberry Café in Santa Monica is offering a special catering menu for the holiday; just make sure to order at least 48 hours in advance. Indulge in house-cured salmon crostini with cream cheese and fresh tarragon, beet salad with fennel and goat cheese, and roasted vegetable torte.

Talia’s Steakhouse — New York City

For Rosh Hashanah this year, Talias is offering three prix fixe menus, two three-course meals (the price varies based on complexity of the entre and dessert options), and a four-course meal. Highlights of each include Middle-Eastern chicken in a pot, grilled shoulder steak, and lamb shanks.

Dino — Washington, D.C.

Indulge in an Italian feast this Rosh Hashanah at Dino. The family-style meal for $49-per-head includes pasta with kabocha squash and lentils; fried potatoes with house applesauce; fish baked with raisins, hazelnuts, wine, and honey; and sfrati (walnut cookies with honey filling).

Street — Los Angeles

This homage to street food around the world from chef Susan Feniger is serving up a special menu for Rosh Hashanah. Highlights include roasted fig flatbread with olive oil, salted honey yogurt, and Yemeni spice mix; yakitori brisket skewers with coal-roasted shishito peppers and sake-soaked beets; and baked apples filled with honey cake. The menu is not fully finalized yet, so be sure to check back closer to Sept 16.


The Epicurious Blog

It all sounds good in theory. Want to celebrate the Rosh Hashanah wish for a sweet New Year? Easy. Eat some sweet honey cake. It sounds like just the ticket: A moist, slightly sticky treat, fragrant with spices and perfect with a cup of tea. The reality of the taste doesn&apost always live up to the sweet symbolism, though. All too often, a slice of honey cake ends up being dry, strangely tough, and packed with cloying spice. Luckily, I&aposve eaten bad honey cake so you don&apost have to. Here are five signs that a honey cake recipe will live up to the sweet dream--and two must-try recipes.

1. Enough oil in the batter. One big reason why honey cake often ends up so dry? Not enough fat in the batter. The healthy helpings of honey in the batter convince some recipe developers that they only need a few spoonfuls of vegetable oil. Wrong. At least a cup is needed for a truly moist crumb.

2. Sugar as well as honey. It&aposs also easy to assume that if you&aposre making honey cake, there&aposs no need for non-honey sweeteners. Nope: since honey is super-dense, it&aposll weigh the cake down if you rely on it exclusively as your source of sweetness. The best recipes have nearly equal parts of honey and sugar (or even brown sugar).

3. Three kinds of spices. Most honey cakes cry out for the addition of sweet spices to add nuance to the honey&aposs subtle sweetness, but some recipes just call for cinnamon. A trio of sweet spices, like cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove, deliver a deeper, richer flavor.

4. A hit of coffee and citrus. So now you&aposve got plenty of sweetness, richness, and spice. That means you need something sharp and acidic to balance out those flavors. An ingredient list that calls for brewed coffee and orange juice or zest fits the bill nicely (a little booze never hurt, either).

5. An overnight rest. Most honey cake recipes will point out that the treat will keep for at least a couple of days. But only a truly brilliant one will assert that honey cake is actually better when baked a day in advance. Like gingerbread and its French cousin, pain d&aposepices, honey cake mellows and deepens in flavor when it gets an overnight rest.

Wondering where to find the ideal honey cake recipe? We&aposve got two that fit the bill right here:


The Epicurious Blog

It all sounds good in theory. Want to celebrate the Rosh Hashanah wish for a sweet New Year? Easy. Eat some sweet honey cake. It sounds like just the ticket: A moist, slightly sticky treat, fragrant with spices and perfect with a cup of tea. The reality of the taste doesn&apost always live up to the sweet symbolism, though. All too often, a slice of honey cake ends up being dry, strangely tough, and packed with cloying spice. Luckily, I&aposve eaten bad honey cake so you don&apost have to. Here are five signs that a honey cake recipe will live up to the sweet dream--and two must-try recipes.

1. Enough oil in the batter. One big reason why honey cake often ends up so dry? Not enough fat in the batter. The healthy helpings of honey in the batter convince some recipe developers that they only need a few spoonfuls of vegetable oil. Wrong. At least a cup is needed for a truly moist crumb.

2. Sugar as well as honey. It&aposs also easy to assume that if you&aposre making honey cake, there&aposs no need for non-honey sweeteners. Nope: since honey is super-dense, it&aposll weigh the cake down if you rely on it exclusively as your source of sweetness. The best recipes have nearly equal parts of honey and sugar (or even brown sugar).

3. Three kinds of spices. Most honey cakes cry out for the addition of sweet spices to add nuance to the honey&aposs subtle sweetness, but some recipes just call for cinnamon. A trio of sweet spices, like cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove, deliver a deeper, richer flavor.

4. A hit of coffee and citrus. So now you&aposve got plenty of sweetness, richness, and spice. That means you need something sharp and acidic to balance out those flavors. An ingredient list that calls for brewed coffee and orange juice or zest fits the bill nicely (a little booze never hurt, either).

5. An overnight rest. Most honey cake recipes will point out that the treat will keep for at least a couple of days. But only a truly brilliant one will assert that honey cake is actually better when baked a day in advance. Like gingerbread and its French cousin, pain d&aposepices, honey cake mellows and deepens in flavor when it gets an overnight rest.

Wondering where to find the ideal honey cake recipe? We&aposve got two that fit the bill right here:


The Epicurious Blog

It all sounds good in theory. Want to celebrate the Rosh Hashanah wish for a sweet New Year? Easy. Eat some sweet honey cake. It sounds like just the ticket: A moist, slightly sticky treat, fragrant with spices and perfect with a cup of tea. The reality of the taste doesn&apost always live up to the sweet symbolism, though. All too often, a slice of honey cake ends up being dry, strangely tough, and packed with cloying spice. Luckily, I&aposve eaten bad honey cake so you don&apost have to. Here are five signs that a honey cake recipe will live up to the sweet dream--and two must-try recipes.

1. Enough oil in the batter. One big reason why honey cake often ends up so dry? Not enough fat in the batter. The healthy helpings of honey in the batter convince some recipe developers that they only need a few spoonfuls of vegetable oil. Wrong. At least a cup is needed for a truly moist crumb.

2. Sugar as well as honey. It&aposs also easy to assume that if you&aposre making honey cake, there&aposs no need for non-honey sweeteners. Nope: since honey is super-dense, it&aposll weigh the cake down if you rely on it exclusively as your source of sweetness. The best recipes have nearly equal parts of honey and sugar (or even brown sugar).

3. Three kinds of spices. Most honey cakes cry out for the addition of sweet spices to add nuance to the honey&aposs subtle sweetness, but some recipes just call for cinnamon. A trio of sweet spices, like cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove, deliver a deeper, richer flavor.

4. A hit of coffee and citrus. So now you&aposve got plenty of sweetness, richness, and spice. That means you need something sharp and acidic to balance out those flavors. An ingredient list that calls for brewed coffee and orange juice or zest fits the bill nicely (a little booze never hurt, either).

5. An overnight rest. Most honey cake recipes will point out that the treat will keep for at least a couple of days. But only a truly brilliant one will assert that honey cake is actually better when baked a day in advance. Like gingerbread and its French cousin, pain d&aposepices, honey cake mellows and deepens in flavor when it gets an overnight rest.

Wondering where to find the ideal honey cake recipe? We&aposve got two that fit the bill right here:


The Epicurious Blog

It all sounds good in theory. Want to celebrate the Rosh Hashanah wish for a sweet New Year? Easy. Eat some sweet honey cake. It sounds like just the ticket: A moist, slightly sticky treat, fragrant with spices and perfect with a cup of tea. The reality of the taste doesn&apost always live up to the sweet symbolism, though. All too often, a slice of honey cake ends up being dry, strangely tough, and packed with cloying spice. Luckily, I&aposve eaten bad honey cake so you don&apost have to. Here are five signs that a honey cake recipe will live up to the sweet dream--and two must-try recipes.

1. Enough oil in the batter. One big reason why honey cake often ends up so dry? Not enough fat in the batter. The healthy helpings of honey in the batter convince some recipe developers that they only need a few spoonfuls of vegetable oil. Wrong. At least a cup is needed for a truly moist crumb.

2. Sugar as well as honey. It&aposs also easy to assume that if you&aposre making honey cake, there&aposs no need for non-honey sweeteners. Nope: since honey is super-dense, it&aposll weigh the cake down if you rely on it exclusively as your source of sweetness. The best recipes have nearly equal parts of honey and sugar (or even brown sugar).

3. Three kinds of spices. Most honey cakes cry out for the addition of sweet spices to add nuance to the honey&aposs subtle sweetness, but some recipes just call for cinnamon. A trio of sweet spices, like cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove, deliver a deeper, richer flavor.

4. A hit of coffee and citrus. So now you&aposve got plenty of sweetness, richness, and spice. That means you need something sharp and acidic to balance out those flavors. An ingredient list that calls for brewed coffee and orange juice or zest fits the bill nicely (a little booze never hurt, either).

5. An overnight rest. Most honey cake recipes will point out that the treat will keep for at least a couple of days. But only a truly brilliant one will assert that honey cake is actually better when baked a day in advance. Like gingerbread and its French cousin, pain d&aposepices, honey cake mellows and deepens in flavor when it gets an overnight rest.

Wondering where to find the ideal honey cake recipe? We&aposve got two that fit the bill right here:


The Epicurious Blog

It all sounds good in theory. Want to celebrate the Rosh Hashanah wish for a sweet New Year? Easy. Eat some sweet honey cake. It sounds like just the ticket: A moist, slightly sticky treat, fragrant with spices and perfect with a cup of tea. The reality of the taste doesn&apost always live up to the sweet symbolism, though. All too often, a slice of honey cake ends up being dry, strangely tough, and packed with cloying spice. Luckily, I&aposve eaten bad honey cake so you don&apost have to. Here are five signs that a honey cake recipe will live up to the sweet dream--and two must-try recipes.

1. Enough oil in the batter. One big reason why honey cake often ends up so dry? Not enough fat in the batter. The healthy helpings of honey in the batter convince some recipe developers that they only need a few spoonfuls of vegetable oil. Wrong. At least a cup is needed for a truly moist crumb.

2. Sugar as well as honey. It&aposs also easy to assume that if you&aposre making honey cake, there&aposs no need for non-honey sweeteners. Nope: since honey is super-dense, it&aposll weigh the cake down if you rely on it exclusively as your source of sweetness. The best recipes have nearly equal parts of honey and sugar (or even brown sugar).

3. Three kinds of spices. Most honey cakes cry out for the addition of sweet spices to add nuance to the honey&aposs subtle sweetness, but some recipes just call for cinnamon. A trio of sweet spices, like cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove, deliver a deeper, richer flavor.

4. A hit of coffee and citrus. So now you&aposve got plenty of sweetness, richness, and spice. That means you need something sharp and acidic to balance out those flavors. An ingredient list that calls for brewed coffee and orange juice or zest fits the bill nicely (a little booze never hurt, either).

5. An overnight rest. Most honey cake recipes will point out that the treat will keep for at least a couple of days. But only a truly brilliant one will assert that honey cake is actually better when baked a day in advance. Like gingerbread and its French cousin, pain d&aposepices, honey cake mellows and deepens in flavor when it gets an overnight rest.

Wondering where to find the ideal honey cake recipe? We&aposve got two that fit the bill right here:


The Epicurious Blog

It all sounds good in theory. Want to celebrate the Rosh Hashanah wish for a sweet New Year? Easy. Eat some sweet honey cake. It sounds like just the ticket: A moist, slightly sticky treat, fragrant with spices and perfect with a cup of tea. The reality of the taste doesn&apost always live up to the sweet symbolism, though. All too often, a slice of honey cake ends up being dry, strangely tough, and packed with cloying spice. Luckily, I&aposve eaten bad honey cake so you don&apost have to. Here are five signs that a honey cake recipe will live up to the sweet dream--and two must-try recipes.

1. Enough oil in the batter. One big reason why honey cake often ends up so dry? Not enough fat in the batter. The healthy helpings of honey in the batter convince some recipe developers that they only need a few spoonfuls of vegetable oil. Wrong. At least a cup is needed for a truly moist crumb.

2. Sugar as well as honey. It&aposs also easy to assume that if you&aposre making honey cake, there&aposs no need for non-honey sweeteners. Nope: since honey is super-dense, it&aposll weigh the cake down if you rely on it exclusively as your source of sweetness. The best recipes have nearly equal parts of honey and sugar (or even brown sugar).

3. Three kinds of spices. Most honey cakes cry out for the addition of sweet spices to add nuance to the honey&aposs subtle sweetness, but some recipes just call for cinnamon. A trio of sweet spices, like cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove, deliver a deeper, richer flavor.

4. A hit of coffee and citrus. So now you&aposve got plenty of sweetness, richness, and spice. That means you need something sharp and acidic to balance out those flavors. An ingredient list that calls for brewed coffee and orange juice or zest fits the bill nicely (a little booze never hurt, either).

5. An overnight rest. Most honey cake recipes will point out that the treat will keep for at least a couple of days. But only a truly brilliant one will assert that honey cake is actually better when baked a day in advance. Like gingerbread and its French cousin, pain d&aposepices, honey cake mellows and deepens in flavor when it gets an overnight rest.

Wondering where to find the ideal honey cake recipe? We&aposve got two that fit the bill right here:


The Epicurious Blog

It all sounds good in theory. Want to celebrate the Rosh Hashanah wish for a sweet New Year? Easy. Eat some sweet honey cake. It sounds like just the ticket: A moist, slightly sticky treat, fragrant with spices and perfect with a cup of tea. The reality of the taste doesn&apost always live up to the sweet symbolism, though. All too often, a slice of honey cake ends up being dry, strangely tough, and packed with cloying spice. Luckily, I&aposve eaten bad honey cake so you don&apost have to. Here are five signs that a honey cake recipe will live up to the sweet dream--and two must-try recipes.

1. Enough oil in the batter. One big reason why honey cake often ends up so dry? Not enough fat in the batter. The healthy helpings of honey in the batter convince some recipe developers that they only need a few spoonfuls of vegetable oil. Wrong. At least a cup is needed for a truly moist crumb.

2. Sugar as well as honey. It&aposs also easy to assume that if you&aposre making honey cake, there&aposs no need for non-honey sweeteners. Nope: since honey is super-dense, it&aposll weigh the cake down if you rely on it exclusively as your source of sweetness. The best recipes have nearly equal parts of honey and sugar (or even brown sugar).

3. Three kinds of spices. Most honey cakes cry out for the addition of sweet spices to add nuance to the honey&aposs subtle sweetness, but some recipes just call for cinnamon. A trio of sweet spices, like cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove, deliver a deeper, richer flavor.

4. A hit of coffee and citrus. So now you&aposve got plenty of sweetness, richness, and spice. That means you need something sharp and acidic to balance out those flavors. An ingredient list that calls for brewed coffee and orange juice or zest fits the bill nicely (a little booze never hurt, either).

5. An overnight rest. Most honey cake recipes will point out that the treat will keep for at least a couple of days. But only a truly brilliant one will assert that honey cake is actually better when baked a day in advance. Like gingerbread and its French cousin, pain d&aposepices, honey cake mellows and deepens in flavor when it gets an overnight rest.

Wondering where to find the ideal honey cake recipe? We&aposve got two that fit the bill right here:


The Epicurious Blog

It all sounds good in theory. Want to celebrate the Rosh Hashanah wish for a sweet New Year? Easy. Eat some sweet honey cake. It sounds like just the ticket: A moist, slightly sticky treat, fragrant with spices and perfect with a cup of tea. The reality of the taste doesn&apost always live up to the sweet symbolism, though. All too often, a slice of honey cake ends up being dry, strangely tough, and packed with cloying spice. Luckily, I&aposve eaten bad honey cake so you don&apost have to. Here are five signs that a honey cake recipe will live up to the sweet dream--and two must-try recipes.

1. Enough oil in the batter. One big reason why honey cake often ends up so dry? Not enough fat in the batter. The healthy helpings of honey in the batter convince some recipe developers that they only need a few spoonfuls of vegetable oil. Wrong. At least a cup is needed for a truly moist crumb.

2. Sugar as well as honey. It&aposs also easy to assume that if you&aposre making honey cake, there&aposs no need for non-honey sweeteners. Nope: since honey is super-dense, it&aposll weigh the cake down if you rely on it exclusively as your source of sweetness. The best recipes have nearly equal parts of honey and sugar (or even brown sugar).

3. Three kinds of spices. Most honey cakes cry out for the addition of sweet spices to add nuance to the honey&aposs subtle sweetness, but some recipes just call for cinnamon. A trio of sweet spices, like cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove, deliver a deeper, richer flavor.

4. A hit of coffee and citrus. So now you&aposve got plenty of sweetness, richness, and spice. That means you need something sharp and acidic to balance out those flavors. An ingredient list that calls for brewed coffee and orange juice or zest fits the bill nicely (a little booze never hurt, either).

5. An overnight rest. Most honey cake recipes will point out that the treat will keep for at least a couple of days. But only a truly brilliant one will assert that honey cake is actually better when baked a day in advance. Like gingerbread and its French cousin, pain d&aposepices, honey cake mellows and deepens in flavor when it gets an overnight rest.

Wondering where to find the ideal honey cake recipe? We&aposve got two that fit the bill right here:


The Epicurious Blog

It all sounds good in theory. Want to celebrate the Rosh Hashanah wish for a sweet New Year? Easy. Eat some sweet honey cake. It sounds like just the ticket: A moist, slightly sticky treat, fragrant with spices and perfect with a cup of tea. The reality of the taste doesn&apost always live up to the sweet symbolism, though. All too often, a slice of honey cake ends up being dry, strangely tough, and packed with cloying spice. Luckily, I&aposve eaten bad honey cake so you don&apost have to. Here are five signs that a honey cake recipe will live up to the sweet dream--and two must-try recipes.

1. Enough oil in the batter. One big reason why honey cake often ends up so dry? Not enough fat in the batter. The healthy helpings of honey in the batter convince some recipe developers that they only need a few spoonfuls of vegetable oil. Wrong. At least a cup is needed for a truly moist crumb.

2. Sugar as well as honey. It&aposs also easy to assume that if you&aposre making honey cake, there&aposs no need for non-honey sweeteners. Nope: since honey is super-dense, it&aposll weigh the cake down if you rely on it exclusively as your source of sweetness. The best recipes have nearly equal parts of honey and sugar (or even brown sugar).

3. Three kinds of spices. Most honey cakes cry out for the addition of sweet spices to add nuance to the honey&aposs subtle sweetness, but some recipes just call for cinnamon. A trio of sweet spices, like cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove, deliver a deeper, richer flavor.

4. A hit of coffee and citrus. So now you&aposve got plenty of sweetness, richness, and spice. That means you need something sharp and acidic to balance out those flavors. An ingredient list that calls for brewed coffee and orange juice or zest fits the bill nicely (a little booze never hurt, either).

5. An overnight rest. Most honey cake recipes will point out that the treat will keep for at least a couple of days. But only a truly brilliant one will assert that honey cake is actually better when baked a day in advance. Like gingerbread and its French cousin, pain d&aposepices, honey cake mellows and deepens in flavor when it gets an overnight rest.

Wondering where to find the ideal honey cake recipe? We&aposve got two that fit the bill right here:


The Epicurious Blog

It all sounds good in theory. Want to celebrate the Rosh Hashanah wish for a sweet New Year? Easy. Eat some sweet honey cake. It sounds like just the ticket: A moist, slightly sticky treat, fragrant with spices and perfect with a cup of tea. The reality of the taste doesn&apost always live up to the sweet symbolism, though. All too often, a slice of honey cake ends up being dry, strangely tough, and packed with cloying spice. Luckily, I&aposve eaten bad honey cake so you don&apost have to. Here are five signs that a honey cake recipe will live up to the sweet dream--and two must-try recipes.

1. Enough oil in the batter. One big reason why honey cake often ends up so dry? Not enough fat in the batter. The healthy helpings of honey in the batter convince some recipe developers that they only need a few spoonfuls of vegetable oil. Wrong. At least a cup is needed for a truly moist crumb.

2. Sugar as well as honey. It&aposs also easy to assume that if you&aposre making honey cake, there&aposs no need for non-honey sweeteners. Nope: since honey is super-dense, it&aposll weigh the cake down if you rely on it exclusively as your source of sweetness. The best recipes have nearly equal parts of honey and sugar (or even brown sugar).

3. Three kinds of spices. Most honey cakes cry out for the addition of sweet spices to add nuance to the honey&aposs subtle sweetness, but some recipes just call for cinnamon. A trio of sweet spices, like cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove, deliver a deeper, richer flavor.

4. A hit of coffee and citrus. So now you&aposve got plenty of sweetness, richness, and spice. That means you need something sharp and acidic to balance out those flavors. An ingredient list that calls for brewed coffee and orange juice or zest fits the bill nicely (a little booze never hurt, either).

5. An overnight rest. Most honey cake recipes will point out that the treat will keep for at least a couple of days. But only a truly brilliant one will assert that honey cake is actually better when baked a day in advance. Like gingerbread and its French cousin, pain d&aposepices, honey cake mellows and deepens in flavor when it gets an overnight rest.

Wondering where to find the ideal honey cake recipe? We&aposve got two that fit the bill right here:


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