Traditional recipes

If Seeing Someone Eat Yogurt Makes You Uncomfortable, You’re Not Alone

If Seeing Someone Eat Yogurt Makes You Uncomfortable, You’re Not Alone

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Yogurt is an awkward food to sit somewhere eating. It’s in the little single-serve cup that you sort of have to scrape to get to the bottom of, and it’s the half-solid, half-liquid texture that you don’t exactly have to chew but still feel compelled to because you’re eating something, resulting in the half-chew.

As awkward as it is to eat a cup of yogurt, just sitting there by yourself doing nothing but staring into it, it’s even more awkward to see someone eating a cup of yogurt. Soup falls into the same camp, especially non-chunky ones like split pea: You can’t just drink it like a liquid; you’ve gotta do the half-chew.

At this point, odds are you’re either nodding in agreement or seriously confused. For those of you who have no idea what I’m talking about, you can stop reading. But for those who also find the act of just sitting there and eating a cup of yogurt by yourself (or watching someone just sitting there eating a cup of yogurt by themselves) really sad and awkward, just know that you’re not alone. If you’d rather cook with yogurt instead, you can find 11 great recipes here.


Women and yogurt: what's the connection?

When war is seemingly looming, the environment is heading for disaster, we're growing brains in jars and everyone is spying on everyone else, it's vital that we don't lose track of the more important things in life. Like yogurt. And, perhaps more crucially, why is it supposedly only women who eat it?

Yogurt is a fairly innocuous substance, occupying the midpoint between milk and cheese on the dairy spectrum, without being considered as much a staple as the former or as much of an indulgence as the latter. It seems to hide in something of a blind-spot in the minds of most people. The UK buys more yogurt than ever, but 10% of all yogurt bought is thrown out uneaten. There are numerous possible reasons for this, but they're probably boring. Yogurt is boring, let's face it. However, there is one fascinating thing about yogurt it is apparently exclusively eaten by women.

This sounds far-fetched, but many people have noticed this. At some point, someone in western society decided that men don't eat yogurt. To date, the only known example of a man liking yogurt is comedian Richard Herring, who dedicated a whole show to the matter (you should buy it, it's good). But one example from one half of the population isn't statistically significant.

So why this blatant gender imbalance? Is it just sexism, or something more profound? As always, the world of science may offer some answers.


Women and yogurt: what's the connection?

When war is seemingly looming, the environment is heading for disaster, we're growing brains in jars and everyone is spying on everyone else, it's vital that we don't lose track of the more important things in life. Like yogurt. And, perhaps more crucially, why is it supposedly only women who eat it?

Yogurt is a fairly innocuous substance, occupying the midpoint between milk and cheese on the dairy spectrum, without being considered as much a staple as the former or as much of an indulgence as the latter. It seems to hide in something of a blind-spot in the minds of most people. The UK buys more yogurt than ever, but 10% of all yogurt bought is thrown out uneaten. There are numerous possible reasons for this, but they're probably boring. Yogurt is boring, let's face it. However, there is one fascinating thing about yogurt it is apparently exclusively eaten by women.

This sounds far-fetched, but many people have noticed this. At some point, someone in western society decided that men don't eat yogurt. To date, the only known example of a man liking yogurt is comedian Richard Herring, who dedicated a whole show to the matter (you should buy it, it's good). But one example from one half of the population isn't statistically significant.

So why this blatant gender imbalance? Is it just sexism, or something more profound? As always, the world of science may offer some answers.


Women and yogurt: what's the connection?

When war is seemingly looming, the environment is heading for disaster, we're growing brains in jars and everyone is spying on everyone else, it's vital that we don't lose track of the more important things in life. Like yogurt. And, perhaps more crucially, why is it supposedly only women who eat it?

Yogurt is a fairly innocuous substance, occupying the midpoint between milk and cheese on the dairy spectrum, without being considered as much a staple as the former or as much of an indulgence as the latter. It seems to hide in something of a blind-spot in the minds of most people. The UK buys more yogurt than ever, but 10% of all yogurt bought is thrown out uneaten. There are numerous possible reasons for this, but they're probably boring. Yogurt is boring, let's face it. However, there is one fascinating thing about yogurt it is apparently exclusively eaten by women.

This sounds far-fetched, but many people have noticed this. At some point, someone in western society decided that men don't eat yogurt. To date, the only known example of a man liking yogurt is comedian Richard Herring, who dedicated a whole show to the matter (you should buy it, it's good). But one example from one half of the population isn't statistically significant.

So why this blatant gender imbalance? Is it just sexism, or something more profound? As always, the world of science may offer some answers.


Women and yogurt: what's the connection?

When war is seemingly looming, the environment is heading for disaster, we're growing brains in jars and everyone is spying on everyone else, it's vital that we don't lose track of the more important things in life. Like yogurt. And, perhaps more crucially, why is it supposedly only women who eat it?

Yogurt is a fairly innocuous substance, occupying the midpoint between milk and cheese on the dairy spectrum, without being considered as much a staple as the former or as much of an indulgence as the latter. It seems to hide in something of a blind-spot in the minds of most people. The UK buys more yogurt than ever, but 10% of all yogurt bought is thrown out uneaten. There are numerous possible reasons for this, but they're probably boring. Yogurt is boring, let's face it. However, there is one fascinating thing about yogurt it is apparently exclusively eaten by women.

This sounds far-fetched, but many people have noticed this. At some point, someone in western society decided that men don't eat yogurt. To date, the only known example of a man liking yogurt is comedian Richard Herring, who dedicated a whole show to the matter (you should buy it, it's good). But one example from one half of the population isn't statistically significant.

So why this blatant gender imbalance? Is it just sexism, or something more profound? As always, the world of science may offer some answers.


Women and yogurt: what's the connection?

When war is seemingly looming, the environment is heading for disaster, we're growing brains in jars and everyone is spying on everyone else, it's vital that we don't lose track of the more important things in life. Like yogurt. And, perhaps more crucially, why is it supposedly only women who eat it?

Yogurt is a fairly innocuous substance, occupying the midpoint between milk and cheese on the dairy spectrum, without being considered as much a staple as the former or as much of an indulgence as the latter. It seems to hide in something of a blind-spot in the minds of most people. The UK buys more yogurt than ever, but 10% of all yogurt bought is thrown out uneaten. There are numerous possible reasons for this, but they're probably boring. Yogurt is boring, let's face it. However, there is one fascinating thing about yogurt it is apparently exclusively eaten by women.

This sounds far-fetched, but many people have noticed this. At some point, someone in western society decided that men don't eat yogurt. To date, the only known example of a man liking yogurt is comedian Richard Herring, who dedicated a whole show to the matter (you should buy it, it's good). But one example from one half of the population isn't statistically significant.

So why this blatant gender imbalance? Is it just sexism, or something more profound? As always, the world of science may offer some answers.


Women and yogurt: what's the connection?

When war is seemingly looming, the environment is heading for disaster, we're growing brains in jars and everyone is spying on everyone else, it's vital that we don't lose track of the more important things in life. Like yogurt. And, perhaps more crucially, why is it supposedly only women who eat it?

Yogurt is a fairly innocuous substance, occupying the midpoint between milk and cheese on the dairy spectrum, without being considered as much a staple as the former or as much of an indulgence as the latter. It seems to hide in something of a blind-spot in the minds of most people. The UK buys more yogurt than ever, but 10% of all yogurt bought is thrown out uneaten. There are numerous possible reasons for this, but they're probably boring. Yogurt is boring, let's face it. However, there is one fascinating thing about yogurt it is apparently exclusively eaten by women.

This sounds far-fetched, but many people have noticed this. At some point, someone in western society decided that men don't eat yogurt. To date, the only known example of a man liking yogurt is comedian Richard Herring, who dedicated a whole show to the matter (you should buy it, it's good). But one example from one half of the population isn't statistically significant.

So why this blatant gender imbalance? Is it just sexism, or something more profound? As always, the world of science may offer some answers.


Women and yogurt: what's the connection?

When war is seemingly looming, the environment is heading for disaster, we're growing brains in jars and everyone is spying on everyone else, it's vital that we don't lose track of the more important things in life. Like yogurt. And, perhaps more crucially, why is it supposedly only women who eat it?

Yogurt is a fairly innocuous substance, occupying the midpoint between milk and cheese on the dairy spectrum, without being considered as much a staple as the former or as much of an indulgence as the latter. It seems to hide in something of a blind-spot in the minds of most people. The UK buys more yogurt than ever, but 10% of all yogurt bought is thrown out uneaten. There are numerous possible reasons for this, but they're probably boring. Yogurt is boring, let's face it. However, there is one fascinating thing about yogurt it is apparently exclusively eaten by women.

This sounds far-fetched, but many people have noticed this. At some point, someone in western society decided that men don't eat yogurt. To date, the only known example of a man liking yogurt is comedian Richard Herring, who dedicated a whole show to the matter (you should buy it, it's good). But one example from one half of the population isn't statistically significant.

So why this blatant gender imbalance? Is it just sexism, or something more profound? As always, the world of science may offer some answers.


Women and yogurt: what's the connection?

When war is seemingly looming, the environment is heading for disaster, we're growing brains in jars and everyone is spying on everyone else, it's vital that we don't lose track of the more important things in life. Like yogurt. And, perhaps more crucially, why is it supposedly only women who eat it?

Yogurt is a fairly innocuous substance, occupying the midpoint between milk and cheese on the dairy spectrum, without being considered as much a staple as the former or as much of an indulgence as the latter. It seems to hide in something of a blind-spot in the minds of most people. The UK buys more yogurt than ever, but 10% of all yogurt bought is thrown out uneaten. There are numerous possible reasons for this, but they're probably boring. Yogurt is boring, let's face it. However, there is one fascinating thing about yogurt it is apparently exclusively eaten by women.

This sounds far-fetched, but many people have noticed this. At some point, someone in western society decided that men don't eat yogurt. To date, the only known example of a man liking yogurt is comedian Richard Herring, who dedicated a whole show to the matter (you should buy it, it's good). But one example from one half of the population isn't statistically significant.

So why this blatant gender imbalance? Is it just sexism, or something more profound? As always, the world of science may offer some answers.


Women and yogurt: what's the connection?

When war is seemingly looming, the environment is heading for disaster, we're growing brains in jars and everyone is spying on everyone else, it's vital that we don't lose track of the more important things in life. Like yogurt. And, perhaps more crucially, why is it supposedly only women who eat it?

Yogurt is a fairly innocuous substance, occupying the midpoint between milk and cheese on the dairy spectrum, without being considered as much a staple as the former or as much of an indulgence as the latter. It seems to hide in something of a blind-spot in the minds of most people. The UK buys more yogurt than ever, but 10% of all yogurt bought is thrown out uneaten. There are numerous possible reasons for this, but they're probably boring. Yogurt is boring, let's face it. However, there is one fascinating thing about yogurt it is apparently exclusively eaten by women.

This sounds far-fetched, but many people have noticed this. At some point, someone in western society decided that men don't eat yogurt. To date, the only known example of a man liking yogurt is comedian Richard Herring, who dedicated a whole show to the matter (you should buy it, it's good). But one example from one half of the population isn't statistically significant.

So why this blatant gender imbalance? Is it just sexism, or something more profound? As always, the world of science may offer some answers.


Women and yogurt: what's the connection?

When war is seemingly looming, the environment is heading for disaster, we're growing brains in jars and everyone is spying on everyone else, it's vital that we don't lose track of the more important things in life. Like yogurt. And, perhaps more crucially, why is it supposedly only women who eat it?

Yogurt is a fairly innocuous substance, occupying the midpoint between milk and cheese on the dairy spectrum, without being considered as much a staple as the former or as much of an indulgence as the latter. It seems to hide in something of a blind-spot in the minds of most people. The UK buys more yogurt than ever, but 10% of all yogurt bought is thrown out uneaten. There are numerous possible reasons for this, but they're probably boring. Yogurt is boring, let's face it. However, there is one fascinating thing about yogurt it is apparently exclusively eaten by women.

This sounds far-fetched, but many people have noticed this. At some point, someone in western society decided that men don't eat yogurt. To date, the only known example of a man liking yogurt is comedian Richard Herring, who dedicated a whole show to the matter (you should buy it, it's good). But one example from one half of the population isn't statistically significant.

So why this blatant gender imbalance? Is it just sexism, or something more profound? As always, the world of science may offer some answers.