Traditional recipes

11 Reasons Soft Serve Is the Best Ice Cream Ever

11 Reasons Soft Serve Is the Best Ice Cream Ever

Soft serve has found that sweet spot between ice cream and frozen yogurt

11 Reasons Soft Serve Is the Best Ice Cream Ever

Soft serve seems to have found that sweet spot between ice cream and fro-yo that makes it a perennial favorite. So why is soft serve so beloved by Americans? We have an idea. Sometimes the success of a food is determined by the sum of its parts. So here is our ode to soft serve, along with some lesser-known facts that explain why soft serve is the best.

1. Flavors

Unlike a trip to Baskin Robbins, at your favorite soft serve haunt, the classics are revered. Chocolate and vanilla are all you need to create your custom cone. We see this as an asset, not a hindrance. It keeps customers thinking creatively about how to dress up their cone.

2. Magic Shell

The magic shell is a thing of wonder. Whether you are a pure chocolate fan, a cherry-dipped fan, or better yet a double-dipped chocolate and cherry lover, one thing is certain: You can’t beat that chocolate shell wrapped around smooth, sweet soft serve.

3. No Waste

Unlike frozen custard, which is often mistaken for soft serve, soft serve does not need to be made fresh daily, which reduces waste. The soft serve base can last for up to a week.

4. Nutrition

Shutterstock / Arina P Habich

Soft serve is better for you than ice cream. Yes, part of the secret to the fluffy texture is soft serve’s lower fat content. So if you are trying to watch your waistline, you don’t have to feel too bad about that pit stop at the ice cream truck after happy hour.

5. Royal Origins

Joseph Sohm / Shutterstock

Believe it or not, this heavenly treat was not created out of thin air. In fact, two of the best-known ice cream franchises lay claim to having invented this wonder: none other than the Dairy Queen herself and the gold standard of ice cream cake confectioners, Carvel.

6. Sprinkle Coating

Shutterstock / HVrattos

Part of what makes this ice cream treat so fantastic are the toppings. Roll your favorite flavors in sprinkles for the perfect ice cream-to-sprinkle ratio that can only be achieved through soft serve.

7. Temperature

If you have sensitive teeth, soft serve may be your ice cream of choice. While normal scoop-able ice cream is produced at around five degrees F, soft serve comes in at around 25 degrees F.

8. Texture

The soft, airy texture of soft serve is due to a combination of its lower fat content and stabilizers that keep your cone from melting at lightning speed. While these stabilizers do have complicated names like “xanthan gum,” they’re naturally derived stabilizers produced from fermented sugars.

9. The “Swirl”

If you can’t choose between those two classic base flavors, then swirl them. No other ice cream offers that option — not frozen custard, and certainly not scoop-able ice cream — so enjoy the chance to have it all.

10. Trendy Soft Serve

The nostalgia for this old-timey classic has led to revitalization and a bit of a soft serve craze. Even some big names got in on the action, like Momofuku’s own Christina Tosi, who deviated from the standard vanilla chocolate — creating flavors like cereal milk and Cracker Jack — which fit in with her growing wacky-flavored dessert empire.

11. Worldwide Phenomenon

We aren’t alone in our love. Soft serve has made its mark around the world. The most recognizable ice cream truck, Mister Softee, opened its first location in China in 2007. Trucks, kiosks, and standalone stores cater to local tastes there, serving green tea- and red bean-flavored soft serve.


11 random facts about Ice Cream

It seems like summer came early this year, especially here in Singapore. And when the heat gets too unbearable, who can resist the cold treat of popsicles, soft-serves and scoops of smooth chocolate, strawberry and vanilla ice cream? I’d say no one. We have put together 11 little-known and interesting facts about ice cream that just may surprise you – and might well inspire your next ice cream rush!

• Ice cream’s history begins way back in ancient China. Chinese rulers created huge ice storage pits and it is believed they were particularly partial to flavoured ices. Meanwhile in Europe, the Roman Emperors had fast runners to bring them snow and ice from the Apennine Mountains. They enjoyed their icy treats mixed with fruit, honey or rose water. Not that much difference from today, really.

• The first popsicle was patented in the USA in 1923. It was invented by lemonade manufacturer Frank Epperson, who claimed to have stumbled upon the idea completely by accident in 1905. Having left out a glass of lemonade with a spoon in it, it froze overnight to create the first lemonade ice pop. On 9th October 1923, Epperson’s fellow countryman Harry Bust registered a patent for vanilla ice cream on a stick with a chocolate coating.

• Soft serve ice cream became very popular in the 1970s and 80s. This type of ice cream initially posed a hygienic risk: many people became ill after eating it as it was made using raw eggs. Today, soft serve ice cream no longer contains raw eggs. Professional soft ice cream machines use a pasteurised substitute instead.

• In the 19th century, many Italian immigrants sold ice creams from a van or from the window of their homes. Piles of floorboards were often placed in front of these so that customers could reach the window more easily, and the first ice cream parlours were born.

• Ice cream is among the top three items most missed by astronauts on space missions according to NASA. The others are pizza and fizzy drinks.

• In the USA, vanilla ice cream is commemorated annually with its own special day – the 23rd July is ‘National Vanilla Ice Day’.

• Nancy Johnson invented the ice cream making machine in 1843. It was operated with a hand crank and revolutionised ice cream production.

• Dairyman Jacob Fussell from Baltimore established the first factory for industrially produced ice cream on 15 June 1851 in Seven Valleys, Pennsylvania.

• The origin of the first ice cream cone is unknown. The New York Museum of Modern Art houses in its collection ice cream cones from Italo Marchioni that date from 1896. In Manchester, Antonio Valvona received the first known patent for a device that could mechanically produce biscuit cups for ice cream in 1902.

• While claims that former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher did invent soft serve may be bending truth just a little bit, she did work for a company at the forefront of popularizing the treat in the UK, between 1949-1951. She may have been working on making the UK variant more compatible with the US machines the company had brought in.

• Having a sore throat? Health experts suggests to eat a dish of cold ice cream to help soothe your burning throat. Eating something cold may help reduce the swelling and irritation in the back of your throat – which may temporarily soothe your throat. You probably should opt for vanilla ice cream and reserve the toppings, chocolate chips or nuts for when you’ve recovered from the sore throat.

If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to our newsletter and keep up-to-date with all the news from the Liebherr World of Freshness. Or, if you have any questions or comments about what you’ve read, please get in touch with us! Simply use the comment function below this post or join in a discussion with us on Facebook.


11 random facts about Ice Cream

It seems like summer came early this year, especially here in Singapore. And when the heat gets too unbearable, who can resist the cold treat of popsicles, soft-serves and scoops of smooth chocolate, strawberry and vanilla ice cream? I’d say no one. We have put together 11 little-known and interesting facts about ice cream that just may surprise you – and might well inspire your next ice cream rush!

• Ice cream’s history begins way back in ancient China. Chinese rulers created huge ice storage pits and it is believed they were particularly partial to flavoured ices. Meanwhile in Europe, the Roman Emperors had fast runners to bring them snow and ice from the Apennine Mountains. They enjoyed their icy treats mixed with fruit, honey or rose water. Not that much difference from today, really.

• The first popsicle was patented in the USA in 1923. It was invented by lemonade manufacturer Frank Epperson, who claimed to have stumbled upon the idea completely by accident in 1905. Having left out a glass of lemonade with a spoon in it, it froze overnight to create the first lemonade ice pop. On 9th October 1923, Epperson’s fellow countryman Harry Bust registered a patent for vanilla ice cream on a stick with a chocolate coating.

• Soft serve ice cream became very popular in the 1970s and 80s. This type of ice cream initially posed a hygienic risk: many people became ill after eating it as it was made using raw eggs. Today, soft serve ice cream no longer contains raw eggs. Professional soft ice cream machines use a pasteurised substitute instead.

• In the 19th century, many Italian immigrants sold ice creams from a van or from the window of their homes. Piles of floorboards were often placed in front of these so that customers could reach the window more easily, and the first ice cream parlours were born.

• Ice cream is among the top three items most missed by astronauts on space missions according to NASA. The others are pizza and fizzy drinks.

• In the USA, vanilla ice cream is commemorated annually with its own special day – the 23rd July is ‘National Vanilla Ice Day’.

• Nancy Johnson invented the ice cream making machine in 1843. It was operated with a hand crank and revolutionised ice cream production.

• Dairyman Jacob Fussell from Baltimore established the first factory for industrially produced ice cream on 15 June 1851 in Seven Valleys, Pennsylvania.

• The origin of the first ice cream cone is unknown. The New York Museum of Modern Art houses in its collection ice cream cones from Italo Marchioni that date from 1896. In Manchester, Antonio Valvona received the first known patent for a device that could mechanically produce biscuit cups for ice cream in 1902.

• While claims that former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher did invent soft serve may be bending truth just a little bit, she did work for a company at the forefront of popularizing the treat in the UK, between 1949-1951. She may have been working on making the UK variant more compatible with the US machines the company had brought in.

• Having a sore throat? Health experts suggests to eat a dish of cold ice cream to help soothe your burning throat. Eating something cold may help reduce the swelling and irritation in the back of your throat – which may temporarily soothe your throat. You probably should opt for vanilla ice cream and reserve the toppings, chocolate chips or nuts for when you’ve recovered from the sore throat.

If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to our newsletter and keep up-to-date with all the news from the Liebherr World of Freshness. Or, if you have any questions or comments about what you’ve read, please get in touch with us! Simply use the comment function below this post or join in a discussion with us on Facebook.


11 random facts about Ice Cream

It seems like summer came early this year, especially here in Singapore. And when the heat gets too unbearable, who can resist the cold treat of popsicles, soft-serves and scoops of smooth chocolate, strawberry and vanilla ice cream? I’d say no one. We have put together 11 little-known and interesting facts about ice cream that just may surprise you – and might well inspire your next ice cream rush!

• Ice cream’s history begins way back in ancient China. Chinese rulers created huge ice storage pits and it is believed they were particularly partial to flavoured ices. Meanwhile in Europe, the Roman Emperors had fast runners to bring them snow and ice from the Apennine Mountains. They enjoyed their icy treats mixed with fruit, honey or rose water. Not that much difference from today, really.

• The first popsicle was patented in the USA in 1923. It was invented by lemonade manufacturer Frank Epperson, who claimed to have stumbled upon the idea completely by accident in 1905. Having left out a glass of lemonade with a spoon in it, it froze overnight to create the first lemonade ice pop. On 9th October 1923, Epperson’s fellow countryman Harry Bust registered a patent for vanilla ice cream on a stick with a chocolate coating.

• Soft serve ice cream became very popular in the 1970s and 80s. This type of ice cream initially posed a hygienic risk: many people became ill after eating it as it was made using raw eggs. Today, soft serve ice cream no longer contains raw eggs. Professional soft ice cream machines use a pasteurised substitute instead.

• In the 19th century, many Italian immigrants sold ice creams from a van or from the window of their homes. Piles of floorboards were often placed in front of these so that customers could reach the window more easily, and the first ice cream parlours were born.

• Ice cream is among the top three items most missed by astronauts on space missions according to NASA. The others are pizza and fizzy drinks.

• In the USA, vanilla ice cream is commemorated annually with its own special day – the 23rd July is ‘National Vanilla Ice Day’.

• Nancy Johnson invented the ice cream making machine in 1843. It was operated with a hand crank and revolutionised ice cream production.

• Dairyman Jacob Fussell from Baltimore established the first factory for industrially produced ice cream on 15 June 1851 in Seven Valleys, Pennsylvania.

• The origin of the first ice cream cone is unknown. The New York Museum of Modern Art houses in its collection ice cream cones from Italo Marchioni that date from 1896. In Manchester, Antonio Valvona received the first known patent for a device that could mechanically produce biscuit cups for ice cream in 1902.

• While claims that former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher did invent soft serve may be bending truth just a little bit, she did work for a company at the forefront of popularizing the treat in the UK, between 1949-1951. She may have been working on making the UK variant more compatible with the US machines the company had brought in.

• Having a sore throat? Health experts suggests to eat a dish of cold ice cream to help soothe your burning throat. Eating something cold may help reduce the swelling and irritation in the back of your throat – which may temporarily soothe your throat. You probably should opt for vanilla ice cream and reserve the toppings, chocolate chips or nuts for when you’ve recovered from the sore throat.

If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to our newsletter and keep up-to-date with all the news from the Liebherr World of Freshness. Or, if you have any questions or comments about what you’ve read, please get in touch with us! Simply use the comment function below this post or join in a discussion with us on Facebook.


11 random facts about Ice Cream

It seems like summer came early this year, especially here in Singapore. And when the heat gets too unbearable, who can resist the cold treat of popsicles, soft-serves and scoops of smooth chocolate, strawberry and vanilla ice cream? I’d say no one. We have put together 11 little-known and interesting facts about ice cream that just may surprise you – and might well inspire your next ice cream rush!

• Ice cream’s history begins way back in ancient China. Chinese rulers created huge ice storage pits and it is believed they were particularly partial to flavoured ices. Meanwhile in Europe, the Roman Emperors had fast runners to bring them snow and ice from the Apennine Mountains. They enjoyed their icy treats mixed with fruit, honey or rose water. Not that much difference from today, really.

• The first popsicle was patented in the USA in 1923. It was invented by lemonade manufacturer Frank Epperson, who claimed to have stumbled upon the idea completely by accident in 1905. Having left out a glass of lemonade with a spoon in it, it froze overnight to create the first lemonade ice pop. On 9th October 1923, Epperson’s fellow countryman Harry Bust registered a patent for vanilla ice cream on a stick with a chocolate coating.

• Soft serve ice cream became very popular in the 1970s and 80s. This type of ice cream initially posed a hygienic risk: many people became ill after eating it as it was made using raw eggs. Today, soft serve ice cream no longer contains raw eggs. Professional soft ice cream machines use a pasteurised substitute instead.

• In the 19th century, many Italian immigrants sold ice creams from a van or from the window of their homes. Piles of floorboards were often placed in front of these so that customers could reach the window more easily, and the first ice cream parlours were born.

• Ice cream is among the top three items most missed by astronauts on space missions according to NASA. The others are pizza and fizzy drinks.

• In the USA, vanilla ice cream is commemorated annually with its own special day – the 23rd July is ‘National Vanilla Ice Day’.

• Nancy Johnson invented the ice cream making machine in 1843. It was operated with a hand crank and revolutionised ice cream production.

• Dairyman Jacob Fussell from Baltimore established the first factory for industrially produced ice cream on 15 June 1851 in Seven Valleys, Pennsylvania.

• The origin of the first ice cream cone is unknown. The New York Museum of Modern Art houses in its collection ice cream cones from Italo Marchioni that date from 1896. In Manchester, Antonio Valvona received the first known patent for a device that could mechanically produce biscuit cups for ice cream in 1902.

• While claims that former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher did invent soft serve may be bending truth just a little bit, she did work for a company at the forefront of popularizing the treat in the UK, between 1949-1951. She may have been working on making the UK variant more compatible with the US machines the company had brought in.

• Having a sore throat? Health experts suggests to eat a dish of cold ice cream to help soothe your burning throat. Eating something cold may help reduce the swelling and irritation in the back of your throat – which may temporarily soothe your throat. You probably should opt for vanilla ice cream and reserve the toppings, chocolate chips or nuts for when you’ve recovered from the sore throat.

If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to our newsletter and keep up-to-date with all the news from the Liebherr World of Freshness. Or, if you have any questions or comments about what you’ve read, please get in touch with us! Simply use the comment function below this post or join in a discussion with us on Facebook.


11 random facts about Ice Cream

It seems like summer came early this year, especially here in Singapore. And when the heat gets too unbearable, who can resist the cold treat of popsicles, soft-serves and scoops of smooth chocolate, strawberry and vanilla ice cream? I’d say no one. We have put together 11 little-known and interesting facts about ice cream that just may surprise you – and might well inspire your next ice cream rush!

• Ice cream’s history begins way back in ancient China. Chinese rulers created huge ice storage pits and it is believed they were particularly partial to flavoured ices. Meanwhile in Europe, the Roman Emperors had fast runners to bring them snow and ice from the Apennine Mountains. They enjoyed their icy treats mixed with fruit, honey or rose water. Not that much difference from today, really.

• The first popsicle was patented in the USA in 1923. It was invented by lemonade manufacturer Frank Epperson, who claimed to have stumbled upon the idea completely by accident in 1905. Having left out a glass of lemonade with a spoon in it, it froze overnight to create the first lemonade ice pop. On 9th October 1923, Epperson’s fellow countryman Harry Bust registered a patent for vanilla ice cream on a stick with a chocolate coating.

• Soft serve ice cream became very popular in the 1970s and 80s. This type of ice cream initially posed a hygienic risk: many people became ill after eating it as it was made using raw eggs. Today, soft serve ice cream no longer contains raw eggs. Professional soft ice cream machines use a pasteurised substitute instead.

• In the 19th century, many Italian immigrants sold ice creams from a van or from the window of their homes. Piles of floorboards were often placed in front of these so that customers could reach the window more easily, and the first ice cream parlours were born.

• Ice cream is among the top three items most missed by astronauts on space missions according to NASA. The others are pizza and fizzy drinks.

• In the USA, vanilla ice cream is commemorated annually with its own special day – the 23rd July is ‘National Vanilla Ice Day’.

• Nancy Johnson invented the ice cream making machine in 1843. It was operated with a hand crank and revolutionised ice cream production.

• Dairyman Jacob Fussell from Baltimore established the first factory for industrially produced ice cream on 15 June 1851 in Seven Valleys, Pennsylvania.

• The origin of the first ice cream cone is unknown. The New York Museum of Modern Art houses in its collection ice cream cones from Italo Marchioni that date from 1896. In Manchester, Antonio Valvona received the first known patent for a device that could mechanically produce biscuit cups for ice cream in 1902.

• While claims that former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher did invent soft serve may be bending truth just a little bit, she did work for a company at the forefront of popularizing the treat in the UK, between 1949-1951. She may have been working on making the UK variant more compatible with the US machines the company had brought in.

• Having a sore throat? Health experts suggests to eat a dish of cold ice cream to help soothe your burning throat. Eating something cold may help reduce the swelling and irritation in the back of your throat – which may temporarily soothe your throat. You probably should opt for vanilla ice cream and reserve the toppings, chocolate chips or nuts for when you’ve recovered from the sore throat.

If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to our newsletter and keep up-to-date with all the news from the Liebherr World of Freshness. Or, if you have any questions or comments about what you’ve read, please get in touch with us! Simply use the comment function below this post or join in a discussion with us on Facebook.


11 random facts about Ice Cream

It seems like summer came early this year, especially here in Singapore. And when the heat gets too unbearable, who can resist the cold treat of popsicles, soft-serves and scoops of smooth chocolate, strawberry and vanilla ice cream? I’d say no one. We have put together 11 little-known and interesting facts about ice cream that just may surprise you – and might well inspire your next ice cream rush!

• Ice cream’s history begins way back in ancient China. Chinese rulers created huge ice storage pits and it is believed they were particularly partial to flavoured ices. Meanwhile in Europe, the Roman Emperors had fast runners to bring them snow and ice from the Apennine Mountains. They enjoyed their icy treats mixed with fruit, honey or rose water. Not that much difference from today, really.

• The first popsicle was patented in the USA in 1923. It was invented by lemonade manufacturer Frank Epperson, who claimed to have stumbled upon the idea completely by accident in 1905. Having left out a glass of lemonade with a spoon in it, it froze overnight to create the first lemonade ice pop. On 9th October 1923, Epperson’s fellow countryman Harry Bust registered a patent for vanilla ice cream on a stick with a chocolate coating.

• Soft serve ice cream became very popular in the 1970s and 80s. This type of ice cream initially posed a hygienic risk: many people became ill after eating it as it was made using raw eggs. Today, soft serve ice cream no longer contains raw eggs. Professional soft ice cream machines use a pasteurised substitute instead.

• In the 19th century, many Italian immigrants sold ice creams from a van or from the window of their homes. Piles of floorboards were often placed in front of these so that customers could reach the window more easily, and the first ice cream parlours were born.

• Ice cream is among the top three items most missed by astronauts on space missions according to NASA. The others are pizza and fizzy drinks.

• In the USA, vanilla ice cream is commemorated annually with its own special day – the 23rd July is ‘National Vanilla Ice Day’.

• Nancy Johnson invented the ice cream making machine in 1843. It was operated with a hand crank and revolutionised ice cream production.

• Dairyman Jacob Fussell from Baltimore established the first factory for industrially produced ice cream on 15 June 1851 in Seven Valleys, Pennsylvania.

• The origin of the first ice cream cone is unknown. The New York Museum of Modern Art houses in its collection ice cream cones from Italo Marchioni that date from 1896. In Manchester, Antonio Valvona received the first known patent for a device that could mechanically produce biscuit cups for ice cream in 1902.

• While claims that former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher did invent soft serve may be bending truth just a little bit, she did work for a company at the forefront of popularizing the treat in the UK, between 1949-1951. She may have been working on making the UK variant more compatible with the US machines the company had brought in.

• Having a sore throat? Health experts suggests to eat a dish of cold ice cream to help soothe your burning throat. Eating something cold may help reduce the swelling and irritation in the back of your throat – which may temporarily soothe your throat. You probably should opt for vanilla ice cream and reserve the toppings, chocolate chips or nuts for when you’ve recovered from the sore throat.

If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to our newsletter and keep up-to-date with all the news from the Liebherr World of Freshness. Or, if you have any questions or comments about what you’ve read, please get in touch with us! Simply use the comment function below this post or join in a discussion with us on Facebook.


11 random facts about Ice Cream

It seems like summer came early this year, especially here in Singapore. And when the heat gets too unbearable, who can resist the cold treat of popsicles, soft-serves and scoops of smooth chocolate, strawberry and vanilla ice cream? I’d say no one. We have put together 11 little-known and interesting facts about ice cream that just may surprise you – and might well inspire your next ice cream rush!

• Ice cream’s history begins way back in ancient China. Chinese rulers created huge ice storage pits and it is believed they were particularly partial to flavoured ices. Meanwhile in Europe, the Roman Emperors had fast runners to bring them snow and ice from the Apennine Mountains. They enjoyed their icy treats mixed with fruit, honey or rose water. Not that much difference from today, really.

• The first popsicle was patented in the USA in 1923. It was invented by lemonade manufacturer Frank Epperson, who claimed to have stumbled upon the idea completely by accident in 1905. Having left out a glass of lemonade with a spoon in it, it froze overnight to create the first lemonade ice pop. On 9th October 1923, Epperson’s fellow countryman Harry Bust registered a patent for vanilla ice cream on a stick with a chocolate coating.

• Soft serve ice cream became very popular in the 1970s and 80s. This type of ice cream initially posed a hygienic risk: many people became ill after eating it as it was made using raw eggs. Today, soft serve ice cream no longer contains raw eggs. Professional soft ice cream machines use a pasteurised substitute instead.

• In the 19th century, many Italian immigrants sold ice creams from a van or from the window of their homes. Piles of floorboards were often placed in front of these so that customers could reach the window more easily, and the first ice cream parlours were born.

• Ice cream is among the top three items most missed by astronauts on space missions according to NASA. The others are pizza and fizzy drinks.

• In the USA, vanilla ice cream is commemorated annually with its own special day – the 23rd July is ‘National Vanilla Ice Day’.

• Nancy Johnson invented the ice cream making machine in 1843. It was operated with a hand crank and revolutionised ice cream production.

• Dairyman Jacob Fussell from Baltimore established the first factory for industrially produced ice cream on 15 June 1851 in Seven Valleys, Pennsylvania.

• The origin of the first ice cream cone is unknown. The New York Museum of Modern Art houses in its collection ice cream cones from Italo Marchioni that date from 1896. In Manchester, Antonio Valvona received the first known patent for a device that could mechanically produce biscuit cups for ice cream in 1902.

• While claims that former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher did invent soft serve may be bending truth just a little bit, she did work for a company at the forefront of popularizing the treat in the UK, between 1949-1951. She may have been working on making the UK variant more compatible with the US machines the company had brought in.

• Having a sore throat? Health experts suggests to eat a dish of cold ice cream to help soothe your burning throat. Eating something cold may help reduce the swelling and irritation in the back of your throat – which may temporarily soothe your throat. You probably should opt for vanilla ice cream and reserve the toppings, chocolate chips or nuts for when you’ve recovered from the sore throat.

If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to our newsletter and keep up-to-date with all the news from the Liebherr World of Freshness. Or, if you have any questions or comments about what you’ve read, please get in touch with us! Simply use the comment function below this post or join in a discussion with us on Facebook.


11 random facts about Ice Cream

It seems like summer came early this year, especially here in Singapore. And when the heat gets too unbearable, who can resist the cold treat of popsicles, soft-serves and scoops of smooth chocolate, strawberry and vanilla ice cream? I’d say no one. We have put together 11 little-known and interesting facts about ice cream that just may surprise you – and might well inspire your next ice cream rush!

• Ice cream’s history begins way back in ancient China. Chinese rulers created huge ice storage pits and it is believed they were particularly partial to flavoured ices. Meanwhile in Europe, the Roman Emperors had fast runners to bring them snow and ice from the Apennine Mountains. They enjoyed their icy treats mixed with fruit, honey or rose water. Not that much difference from today, really.

• The first popsicle was patented in the USA in 1923. It was invented by lemonade manufacturer Frank Epperson, who claimed to have stumbled upon the idea completely by accident in 1905. Having left out a glass of lemonade with a spoon in it, it froze overnight to create the first lemonade ice pop. On 9th October 1923, Epperson’s fellow countryman Harry Bust registered a patent for vanilla ice cream on a stick with a chocolate coating.

• Soft serve ice cream became very popular in the 1970s and 80s. This type of ice cream initially posed a hygienic risk: many people became ill after eating it as it was made using raw eggs. Today, soft serve ice cream no longer contains raw eggs. Professional soft ice cream machines use a pasteurised substitute instead.

• In the 19th century, many Italian immigrants sold ice creams from a van or from the window of their homes. Piles of floorboards were often placed in front of these so that customers could reach the window more easily, and the first ice cream parlours were born.

• Ice cream is among the top three items most missed by astronauts on space missions according to NASA. The others are pizza and fizzy drinks.

• In the USA, vanilla ice cream is commemorated annually with its own special day – the 23rd July is ‘National Vanilla Ice Day’.

• Nancy Johnson invented the ice cream making machine in 1843. It was operated with a hand crank and revolutionised ice cream production.

• Dairyman Jacob Fussell from Baltimore established the first factory for industrially produced ice cream on 15 June 1851 in Seven Valleys, Pennsylvania.

• The origin of the first ice cream cone is unknown. The New York Museum of Modern Art houses in its collection ice cream cones from Italo Marchioni that date from 1896. In Manchester, Antonio Valvona received the first known patent for a device that could mechanically produce biscuit cups for ice cream in 1902.

• While claims that former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher did invent soft serve may be bending truth just a little bit, she did work for a company at the forefront of popularizing the treat in the UK, between 1949-1951. She may have been working on making the UK variant more compatible with the US machines the company had brought in.

• Having a sore throat? Health experts suggests to eat a dish of cold ice cream to help soothe your burning throat. Eating something cold may help reduce the swelling and irritation in the back of your throat – which may temporarily soothe your throat. You probably should opt for vanilla ice cream and reserve the toppings, chocolate chips or nuts for when you’ve recovered from the sore throat.

If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to our newsletter and keep up-to-date with all the news from the Liebherr World of Freshness. Or, if you have any questions or comments about what you’ve read, please get in touch with us! Simply use the comment function below this post or join in a discussion with us on Facebook.


11 random facts about Ice Cream

It seems like summer came early this year, especially here in Singapore. And when the heat gets too unbearable, who can resist the cold treat of popsicles, soft-serves and scoops of smooth chocolate, strawberry and vanilla ice cream? I’d say no one. We have put together 11 little-known and interesting facts about ice cream that just may surprise you – and might well inspire your next ice cream rush!

• Ice cream’s history begins way back in ancient China. Chinese rulers created huge ice storage pits and it is believed they were particularly partial to flavoured ices. Meanwhile in Europe, the Roman Emperors had fast runners to bring them snow and ice from the Apennine Mountains. They enjoyed their icy treats mixed with fruit, honey or rose water. Not that much difference from today, really.

• The first popsicle was patented in the USA in 1923. It was invented by lemonade manufacturer Frank Epperson, who claimed to have stumbled upon the idea completely by accident in 1905. Having left out a glass of lemonade with a spoon in it, it froze overnight to create the first lemonade ice pop. On 9th October 1923, Epperson’s fellow countryman Harry Bust registered a patent for vanilla ice cream on a stick with a chocolate coating.

• Soft serve ice cream became very popular in the 1970s and 80s. This type of ice cream initially posed a hygienic risk: many people became ill after eating it as it was made using raw eggs. Today, soft serve ice cream no longer contains raw eggs. Professional soft ice cream machines use a pasteurised substitute instead.

• In the 19th century, many Italian immigrants sold ice creams from a van or from the window of their homes. Piles of floorboards were often placed in front of these so that customers could reach the window more easily, and the first ice cream parlours were born.

• Ice cream is among the top three items most missed by astronauts on space missions according to NASA. The others are pizza and fizzy drinks.

• In the USA, vanilla ice cream is commemorated annually with its own special day – the 23rd July is ‘National Vanilla Ice Day’.

• Nancy Johnson invented the ice cream making machine in 1843. It was operated with a hand crank and revolutionised ice cream production.

• Dairyman Jacob Fussell from Baltimore established the first factory for industrially produced ice cream on 15 June 1851 in Seven Valleys, Pennsylvania.

• The origin of the first ice cream cone is unknown. The New York Museum of Modern Art houses in its collection ice cream cones from Italo Marchioni that date from 1896. In Manchester, Antonio Valvona received the first known patent for a device that could mechanically produce biscuit cups for ice cream in 1902.

• While claims that former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher did invent soft serve may be bending truth just a little bit, she did work for a company at the forefront of popularizing the treat in the UK, between 1949-1951. She may have been working on making the UK variant more compatible with the US machines the company had brought in.

• Having a sore throat? Health experts suggests to eat a dish of cold ice cream to help soothe your burning throat. Eating something cold may help reduce the swelling and irritation in the back of your throat – which may temporarily soothe your throat. You probably should opt for vanilla ice cream and reserve the toppings, chocolate chips or nuts for when you’ve recovered from the sore throat.

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11 random facts about Ice Cream

It seems like summer came early this year, especially here in Singapore. And when the heat gets too unbearable, who can resist the cold treat of popsicles, soft-serves and scoops of smooth chocolate, strawberry and vanilla ice cream? I’d say no one. We have put together 11 little-known and interesting facts about ice cream that just may surprise you – and might well inspire your next ice cream rush!

• Ice cream’s history begins way back in ancient China. Chinese rulers created huge ice storage pits and it is believed they were particularly partial to flavoured ices. Meanwhile in Europe, the Roman Emperors had fast runners to bring them snow and ice from the Apennine Mountains. They enjoyed their icy treats mixed with fruit, honey or rose water. Not that much difference from today, really.

• The first popsicle was patented in the USA in 1923. It was invented by lemonade manufacturer Frank Epperson, who claimed to have stumbled upon the idea completely by accident in 1905. Having left out a glass of lemonade with a spoon in it, it froze overnight to create the first lemonade ice pop. On 9th October 1923, Epperson’s fellow countryman Harry Bust registered a patent for vanilla ice cream on a stick with a chocolate coating.

• Soft serve ice cream became very popular in the 1970s and 80s. This type of ice cream initially posed a hygienic risk: many people became ill after eating it as it was made using raw eggs. Today, soft serve ice cream no longer contains raw eggs. Professional soft ice cream machines use a pasteurised substitute instead.

• In the 19th century, many Italian immigrants sold ice creams from a van or from the window of their homes. Piles of floorboards were often placed in front of these so that customers could reach the window more easily, and the first ice cream parlours were born.

• Ice cream is among the top three items most missed by astronauts on space missions according to NASA. The others are pizza and fizzy drinks.

• In the USA, vanilla ice cream is commemorated annually with its own special day – the 23rd July is ‘National Vanilla Ice Day’.

• Nancy Johnson invented the ice cream making machine in 1843. It was operated with a hand crank and revolutionised ice cream production.

• Dairyman Jacob Fussell from Baltimore established the first factory for industrially produced ice cream on 15 June 1851 in Seven Valleys, Pennsylvania.

• The origin of the first ice cream cone is unknown. The New York Museum of Modern Art houses in its collection ice cream cones from Italo Marchioni that date from 1896. In Manchester, Antonio Valvona received the first known patent for a device that could mechanically produce biscuit cups for ice cream in 1902.

• While claims that former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher did invent soft serve may be bending truth just a little bit, she did work for a company at the forefront of popularizing the treat in the UK, between 1949-1951. She may have been working on making the UK variant more compatible with the US machines the company had brought in.

• Having a sore throat? Health experts suggests to eat a dish of cold ice cream to help soothe your burning throat. Eating something cold may help reduce the swelling and irritation in the back of your throat – which may temporarily soothe your throat. You probably should opt for vanilla ice cream and reserve the toppings, chocolate chips or nuts for when you’ve recovered from the sore throat.

If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to our newsletter and keep up-to-date with all the news from the Liebherr World of Freshness. Or, if you have any questions or comments about what you’ve read, please get in touch with us! Simply use the comment function below this post or join in a discussion with us on Facebook.