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Wearable Tech: CUFF Is a Jewelry Line That Might Just Save Your Life

Wearable Tech: CUFF Is a Jewelry Line That Might Just Save Your Life


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We’re all about cool wearable technology—vests that can update our Facebook, smart watches that can keep our schedule handy, and heat-enabled color changing fabric à la Alexander Wang, are all at the top of our wish lists this year. But what about a piece of jewelry that can save your life? What if you could wear a chic bracelet that will actually alert friends and family that you’re in danger? Cuff, a new jewelry line, is premiering a collection of baubles and accessories embedded with CuffLinc, a tiny, wireless transmitter to let you and your loved ones know where you and if you need help. Coming in an assortment of designs and styles, Cuff is available in necklaces, bracelets and key chains that are not only fashionable, but could potentially save your life. {start-jlvideo}1671,640,361,thumb{end-jlvideo}

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Designer and founder Deepa Sood, former Vice President of product development at Restoration Hardware, started Cuff to make sure that wearable technology would not only be useful but also beautiful—pieces that women (and men) would truly enjoy wearing. “The new Cuff collection wearables are more chic than geek, wrapping smart technology into elegant, fashionable pieces that we all WANT to wear," said Sood. “We don’t believe that we should be forced to choose between smarts and beauty when it comes to wearable accessories.”

The CuffLinc transmitter is interchangeable between different pieces of Cuff jewelry so that way no matter which piece you choose to wear that day, you’ll be protected. Pearl jewelry that looks like heirloom pieces are excellent for mom’s or grandparents, while some of the simple rubber bracelets are great for men and workouts. Simple chains or bold cuffs work for women of all ages and the fun leather banded bracelets are super trendy for teens and kids. “What we wear is a very personal choice—you need options and you want what you wear to reflect your style and fit into your life,” Sood said. “That is what we are providing with Cuff—options in wearable tech. We’re introducing an entire collection because everyone is different and we want Cuff to fit into many lifestyles and situations. We’re also going to bring our CuffLinc technology to the entire fashion ecosystem so all retailers and designers can create fashionable and wearable options.”

The CuffLinc connects to your phone to send alerts to anyone on your pre-chosen network which can include family, friends and neighbors. Pressing down on the piece for three seconds sends a signal to your Cuff app which in turn alerts people that you need help. The piece will vibrate silently and discretely to let only you know that your trusted network has received your alarm. The device not only alerts family and friends but will also instantly send them coordinates to your location so they can send help as fast as possible.

“We think Cuff offers the most streamlined personal security solution on the market, but it’s not just for emergencies,” Sood said. “It’s also a great way to just let people know you are trying to reach them and you need a response. Because you’re wearing Cuff, it’s easy to send and receive notices without digging out your phone – which, if you’re like me, is often at the bottom of a huge handbag.” And while using it just to let your boyfriend know you’re been trying to reach him about dinner plans may be a little boy-who-cried-wolf, we can’t exactly argue that it’s a bad idea—but maybe keep it to a minimum.

While Cuff is currently only available for the iPhone and other Apple devices because of Bluetooth consistencies, Sood is looking for a way to make it compatible with the Android as soon as possible. Cuff will also be licensing their idea to retailers and designers so that the line can become a true fashion collection. As they grow the line will expand, and while it is currently only available in North America and Europe, they will undoubtedly be looking at the Asian markets sometime within the next year or so. Pieces are available for preorder online to be shipped early this fall and are currently priced from $50-$150; and while that’s not exactly a luxurious price point, per se, we have to say—you can’t really put a price on your life.


How Elsa Peretti and Tiffany’s Bone Cuff Changed Jewelry Forever

STILL LIFE Elsa Peretti’s early ’80s Thumbprint bowl (top) and Padova magnifying glass (bottom) for Tiffany & Co. A new version of her Bone Cuff (far right), out this year. Tiffany & Co. dish, $295, magnifying glass, $275, and cuff, $7,500, tiffany​.com

It’s curious, considering how Elsa Peretti revolutionized the jewelry world in the 1970s, that today the reclusive, enigmatic and famously fiery designer has such a resistance to newness. She rants over continual requests for “new, new, new,” saying, with a husky flourish, “For me nothing is new. Good line and good form are timeless.

“The 21st century is not my cup of tea. I belong to another century,” says Peretti, speaking by phone from her home in Spain. Long before Covid-induced lockdowns, Peretti had retreated into splendid isolation, with only trusted staff and dogs for company in the tiny medieval hamlet of Sant Martí Vell, outside of Barcelona. It’s here that she finds the strength she needs to work, here that she’s surrounded by the nature that inspires her forms. “I had to isolate,” she says. Peretti was always ahead of her time.

The tempestuous Italian-born model-turned–jewelry designer, creator of some of the most recognizable jewelry designs on the planet—sensual, modern-day amulets including the Open Heart, the Bean Design and the Bone Cuff—turned 80 this year. To celebrate this milestone, and to mark 50 years since the first Bone Cuff, Tiffany & Co., for whom Peretti has been a named designer since 1974, launched new editions of the sculptural, wrist-clenching cuff-bangle in vibrant red, green and blue in May. Out in September are new silver and gold versions with stones like turquoise, tiger’s eye and white, black and green jade. The carved, drop-shaped stones seem to grow organically out of undulating metal. Surprisingly, Peretti welcomes this note of striking newness, explaining that the idea for the colors came from a “very young guy in the atelier.” She says, “I don’t do anything new.”

Her conversation is stream of consciousness, with half-sentences, twists and turns, statements and rebuttals, delivered in a deep, cigarette-honed Italian accent. She describes herself as retired yet still talks regularly with all her ateliers and artisans, in Spain and around the world: glassworkers in Venice, lacquer and basketwork masters in Japan, stone carvers in Hong Kong and more. All are skilled artisans she first sought out during long trips near the beginning of her design career in the mid-’70s, when she used to travel with her Chinese lovebirds in ornamental cages.

In Sant Martí Vell, old stone houses huddle together along steep cobbled alleyways, connected by underground tunnels, some purported to date from the Inquisition. A small church square is adjacent to a converted tax office, which is now Peretti’s main home. Since she first came upon the run-down village in 1969, Peretti has acquired and restored houses, one by one, as they became available. “Sant Martí Vell has been so good for me,” she says. “The work on the houses and roofs here took me away from the focus on my image as a jewelry designer.”


How Elsa Peretti and Tiffany’s Bone Cuff Changed Jewelry Forever

STILL LIFE Elsa Peretti’s early ’80s Thumbprint bowl (top) and Padova magnifying glass (bottom) for Tiffany & Co. A new version of her Bone Cuff (far right), out this year. Tiffany & Co. dish, $295, magnifying glass, $275, and cuff, $7,500, tiffany​.com

It’s curious, considering how Elsa Peretti revolutionized the jewelry world in the 1970s, that today the reclusive, enigmatic and famously fiery designer has such a resistance to newness. She rants over continual requests for “new, new, new,” saying, with a husky flourish, “For me nothing is new. Good line and good form are timeless.

“The 21st century is not my cup of tea. I belong to another century,” says Peretti, speaking by phone from her home in Spain. Long before Covid-induced lockdowns, Peretti had retreated into splendid isolation, with only trusted staff and dogs for company in the tiny medieval hamlet of Sant Martí Vell, outside of Barcelona. It’s here that she finds the strength she needs to work, here that she’s surrounded by the nature that inspires her forms. “I had to isolate,” she says. Peretti was always ahead of her time.

The tempestuous Italian-born model-turned–jewelry designer, creator of some of the most recognizable jewelry designs on the planet—sensual, modern-day amulets including the Open Heart, the Bean Design and the Bone Cuff—turned 80 this year. To celebrate this milestone, and to mark 50 years since the first Bone Cuff, Tiffany & Co., for whom Peretti has been a named designer since 1974, launched new editions of the sculptural, wrist-clenching cuff-bangle in vibrant red, green and blue in May. Out in September are new silver and gold versions with stones like turquoise, tiger’s eye and white, black and green jade. The carved, drop-shaped stones seem to grow organically out of undulating metal. Surprisingly, Peretti welcomes this note of striking newness, explaining that the idea for the colors came from a “very young guy in the atelier.” She says, “I don’t do anything new.”

Her conversation is stream of consciousness, with half-sentences, twists and turns, statements and rebuttals, delivered in a deep, cigarette-honed Italian accent. She describes herself as retired yet still talks regularly with all her ateliers and artisans, in Spain and around the world: glassworkers in Venice, lacquer and basketwork masters in Japan, stone carvers in Hong Kong and more. All are skilled artisans she first sought out during long trips near the beginning of her design career in the mid-’70s, when she used to travel with her Chinese lovebirds in ornamental cages.

In Sant Martí Vell, old stone houses huddle together along steep cobbled alleyways, connected by underground tunnels, some purported to date from the Inquisition. A small church square is adjacent to a converted tax office, which is now Peretti’s main home. Since she first came upon the run-down village in 1969, Peretti has acquired and restored houses, one by one, as they became available. “Sant Martí Vell has been so good for me,” she says. “The work on the houses and roofs here took me away from the focus on my image as a jewelry designer.”


How Elsa Peretti and Tiffany’s Bone Cuff Changed Jewelry Forever

STILL LIFE Elsa Peretti’s early ’80s Thumbprint bowl (top) and Padova magnifying glass (bottom) for Tiffany & Co. A new version of her Bone Cuff (far right), out this year. Tiffany & Co. dish, $295, magnifying glass, $275, and cuff, $7,500, tiffany​.com

It’s curious, considering how Elsa Peretti revolutionized the jewelry world in the 1970s, that today the reclusive, enigmatic and famously fiery designer has such a resistance to newness. She rants over continual requests for “new, new, new,” saying, with a husky flourish, “For me nothing is new. Good line and good form are timeless.

“The 21st century is not my cup of tea. I belong to another century,” says Peretti, speaking by phone from her home in Spain. Long before Covid-induced lockdowns, Peretti had retreated into splendid isolation, with only trusted staff and dogs for company in the tiny medieval hamlet of Sant Martí Vell, outside of Barcelona. It’s here that she finds the strength she needs to work, here that she’s surrounded by the nature that inspires her forms. “I had to isolate,” she says. Peretti was always ahead of her time.

The tempestuous Italian-born model-turned–jewelry designer, creator of some of the most recognizable jewelry designs on the planet—sensual, modern-day amulets including the Open Heart, the Bean Design and the Bone Cuff—turned 80 this year. To celebrate this milestone, and to mark 50 years since the first Bone Cuff, Tiffany & Co., for whom Peretti has been a named designer since 1974, launched new editions of the sculptural, wrist-clenching cuff-bangle in vibrant red, green and blue in May. Out in September are new silver and gold versions with stones like turquoise, tiger’s eye and white, black and green jade. The carved, drop-shaped stones seem to grow organically out of undulating metal. Surprisingly, Peretti welcomes this note of striking newness, explaining that the idea for the colors came from a “very young guy in the atelier.” She says, “I don’t do anything new.”

Her conversation is stream of consciousness, with half-sentences, twists and turns, statements and rebuttals, delivered in a deep, cigarette-honed Italian accent. She describes herself as retired yet still talks regularly with all her ateliers and artisans, in Spain and around the world: glassworkers in Venice, lacquer and basketwork masters in Japan, stone carvers in Hong Kong and more. All are skilled artisans she first sought out during long trips near the beginning of her design career in the mid-’70s, when she used to travel with her Chinese lovebirds in ornamental cages.

In Sant Martí Vell, old stone houses huddle together along steep cobbled alleyways, connected by underground tunnels, some purported to date from the Inquisition. A small church square is adjacent to a converted tax office, which is now Peretti’s main home. Since she first came upon the run-down village in 1969, Peretti has acquired and restored houses, one by one, as they became available. “Sant Martí Vell has been so good for me,” she says. “The work on the houses and roofs here took me away from the focus on my image as a jewelry designer.”


How Elsa Peretti and Tiffany’s Bone Cuff Changed Jewelry Forever

STILL LIFE Elsa Peretti’s early ’80s Thumbprint bowl (top) and Padova magnifying glass (bottom) for Tiffany & Co. A new version of her Bone Cuff (far right), out this year. Tiffany & Co. dish, $295, magnifying glass, $275, and cuff, $7,500, tiffany​.com

It’s curious, considering how Elsa Peretti revolutionized the jewelry world in the 1970s, that today the reclusive, enigmatic and famously fiery designer has such a resistance to newness. She rants over continual requests for “new, new, new,” saying, with a husky flourish, “For me nothing is new. Good line and good form are timeless.

“The 21st century is not my cup of tea. I belong to another century,” says Peretti, speaking by phone from her home in Spain. Long before Covid-induced lockdowns, Peretti had retreated into splendid isolation, with only trusted staff and dogs for company in the tiny medieval hamlet of Sant Martí Vell, outside of Barcelona. It’s here that she finds the strength she needs to work, here that she’s surrounded by the nature that inspires her forms. “I had to isolate,” she says. Peretti was always ahead of her time.

The tempestuous Italian-born model-turned–jewelry designer, creator of some of the most recognizable jewelry designs on the planet—sensual, modern-day amulets including the Open Heart, the Bean Design and the Bone Cuff—turned 80 this year. To celebrate this milestone, and to mark 50 years since the first Bone Cuff, Tiffany & Co., for whom Peretti has been a named designer since 1974, launched new editions of the sculptural, wrist-clenching cuff-bangle in vibrant red, green and blue in May. Out in September are new silver and gold versions with stones like turquoise, tiger’s eye and white, black and green jade. The carved, drop-shaped stones seem to grow organically out of undulating metal. Surprisingly, Peretti welcomes this note of striking newness, explaining that the idea for the colors came from a “very young guy in the atelier.” She says, “I don’t do anything new.”

Her conversation is stream of consciousness, with half-sentences, twists and turns, statements and rebuttals, delivered in a deep, cigarette-honed Italian accent. She describes herself as retired yet still talks regularly with all her ateliers and artisans, in Spain and around the world: glassworkers in Venice, lacquer and basketwork masters in Japan, stone carvers in Hong Kong and more. All are skilled artisans she first sought out during long trips near the beginning of her design career in the mid-’70s, when she used to travel with her Chinese lovebirds in ornamental cages.

In Sant Martí Vell, old stone houses huddle together along steep cobbled alleyways, connected by underground tunnels, some purported to date from the Inquisition. A small church square is adjacent to a converted tax office, which is now Peretti’s main home. Since she first came upon the run-down village in 1969, Peretti has acquired and restored houses, one by one, as they became available. “Sant Martí Vell has been so good for me,” she says. “The work on the houses and roofs here took me away from the focus on my image as a jewelry designer.”


How Elsa Peretti and Tiffany’s Bone Cuff Changed Jewelry Forever

STILL LIFE Elsa Peretti’s early ’80s Thumbprint bowl (top) and Padova magnifying glass (bottom) for Tiffany & Co. A new version of her Bone Cuff (far right), out this year. Tiffany & Co. dish, $295, magnifying glass, $275, and cuff, $7,500, tiffany​.com

It’s curious, considering how Elsa Peretti revolutionized the jewelry world in the 1970s, that today the reclusive, enigmatic and famously fiery designer has such a resistance to newness. She rants over continual requests for “new, new, new,” saying, with a husky flourish, “For me nothing is new. Good line and good form are timeless.

“The 21st century is not my cup of tea. I belong to another century,” says Peretti, speaking by phone from her home in Spain. Long before Covid-induced lockdowns, Peretti had retreated into splendid isolation, with only trusted staff and dogs for company in the tiny medieval hamlet of Sant Martí Vell, outside of Barcelona. It’s here that she finds the strength she needs to work, here that she’s surrounded by the nature that inspires her forms. “I had to isolate,” she says. Peretti was always ahead of her time.

The tempestuous Italian-born model-turned–jewelry designer, creator of some of the most recognizable jewelry designs on the planet—sensual, modern-day amulets including the Open Heart, the Bean Design and the Bone Cuff—turned 80 this year. To celebrate this milestone, and to mark 50 years since the first Bone Cuff, Tiffany & Co., for whom Peretti has been a named designer since 1974, launched new editions of the sculptural, wrist-clenching cuff-bangle in vibrant red, green and blue in May. Out in September are new silver and gold versions with stones like turquoise, tiger’s eye and white, black and green jade. The carved, drop-shaped stones seem to grow organically out of undulating metal. Surprisingly, Peretti welcomes this note of striking newness, explaining that the idea for the colors came from a “very young guy in the atelier.” She says, “I don’t do anything new.”

Her conversation is stream of consciousness, with half-sentences, twists and turns, statements and rebuttals, delivered in a deep, cigarette-honed Italian accent. She describes herself as retired yet still talks regularly with all her ateliers and artisans, in Spain and around the world: glassworkers in Venice, lacquer and basketwork masters in Japan, stone carvers in Hong Kong and more. All are skilled artisans she first sought out during long trips near the beginning of her design career in the mid-’70s, when she used to travel with her Chinese lovebirds in ornamental cages.

In Sant Martí Vell, old stone houses huddle together along steep cobbled alleyways, connected by underground tunnels, some purported to date from the Inquisition. A small church square is adjacent to a converted tax office, which is now Peretti’s main home. Since she first came upon the run-down village in 1969, Peretti has acquired and restored houses, one by one, as they became available. “Sant Martí Vell has been so good for me,” she says. “The work on the houses and roofs here took me away from the focus on my image as a jewelry designer.”


How Elsa Peretti and Tiffany’s Bone Cuff Changed Jewelry Forever

STILL LIFE Elsa Peretti’s early ’80s Thumbprint bowl (top) and Padova magnifying glass (bottom) for Tiffany & Co. A new version of her Bone Cuff (far right), out this year. Tiffany & Co. dish, $295, magnifying glass, $275, and cuff, $7,500, tiffany​.com

It’s curious, considering how Elsa Peretti revolutionized the jewelry world in the 1970s, that today the reclusive, enigmatic and famously fiery designer has such a resistance to newness. She rants over continual requests for “new, new, new,” saying, with a husky flourish, “For me nothing is new. Good line and good form are timeless.

“The 21st century is not my cup of tea. I belong to another century,” says Peretti, speaking by phone from her home in Spain. Long before Covid-induced lockdowns, Peretti had retreated into splendid isolation, with only trusted staff and dogs for company in the tiny medieval hamlet of Sant Martí Vell, outside of Barcelona. It’s here that she finds the strength she needs to work, here that she’s surrounded by the nature that inspires her forms. “I had to isolate,” she says. Peretti was always ahead of her time.

The tempestuous Italian-born model-turned–jewelry designer, creator of some of the most recognizable jewelry designs on the planet—sensual, modern-day amulets including the Open Heart, the Bean Design and the Bone Cuff—turned 80 this year. To celebrate this milestone, and to mark 50 years since the first Bone Cuff, Tiffany & Co., for whom Peretti has been a named designer since 1974, launched new editions of the sculptural, wrist-clenching cuff-bangle in vibrant red, green and blue in May. Out in September are new silver and gold versions with stones like turquoise, tiger’s eye and white, black and green jade. The carved, drop-shaped stones seem to grow organically out of undulating metal. Surprisingly, Peretti welcomes this note of striking newness, explaining that the idea for the colors came from a “very young guy in the atelier.” She says, “I don’t do anything new.”

Her conversation is stream of consciousness, with half-sentences, twists and turns, statements and rebuttals, delivered in a deep, cigarette-honed Italian accent. She describes herself as retired yet still talks regularly with all her ateliers and artisans, in Spain and around the world: glassworkers in Venice, lacquer and basketwork masters in Japan, stone carvers in Hong Kong and more. All are skilled artisans she first sought out during long trips near the beginning of her design career in the mid-’70s, when she used to travel with her Chinese lovebirds in ornamental cages.

In Sant Martí Vell, old stone houses huddle together along steep cobbled alleyways, connected by underground tunnels, some purported to date from the Inquisition. A small church square is adjacent to a converted tax office, which is now Peretti’s main home. Since she first came upon the run-down village in 1969, Peretti has acquired and restored houses, one by one, as they became available. “Sant Martí Vell has been so good for me,” she says. “The work on the houses and roofs here took me away from the focus on my image as a jewelry designer.”


How Elsa Peretti and Tiffany’s Bone Cuff Changed Jewelry Forever

STILL LIFE Elsa Peretti’s early ’80s Thumbprint bowl (top) and Padova magnifying glass (bottom) for Tiffany & Co. A new version of her Bone Cuff (far right), out this year. Tiffany & Co. dish, $295, magnifying glass, $275, and cuff, $7,500, tiffany​.com

It’s curious, considering how Elsa Peretti revolutionized the jewelry world in the 1970s, that today the reclusive, enigmatic and famously fiery designer has such a resistance to newness. She rants over continual requests for “new, new, new,” saying, with a husky flourish, “For me nothing is new. Good line and good form are timeless.

“The 21st century is not my cup of tea. I belong to another century,” says Peretti, speaking by phone from her home in Spain. Long before Covid-induced lockdowns, Peretti had retreated into splendid isolation, with only trusted staff and dogs for company in the tiny medieval hamlet of Sant Martí Vell, outside of Barcelona. It’s here that she finds the strength she needs to work, here that she’s surrounded by the nature that inspires her forms. “I had to isolate,” she says. Peretti was always ahead of her time.

The tempestuous Italian-born model-turned–jewelry designer, creator of some of the most recognizable jewelry designs on the planet—sensual, modern-day amulets including the Open Heart, the Bean Design and the Bone Cuff—turned 80 this year. To celebrate this milestone, and to mark 50 years since the first Bone Cuff, Tiffany & Co., for whom Peretti has been a named designer since 1974, launched new editions of the sculptural, wrist-clenching cuff-bangle in vibrant red, green and blue in May. Out in September are new silver and gold versions with stones like turquoise, tiger’s eye and white, black and green jade. The carved, drop-shaped stones seem to grow organically out of undulating metal. Surprisingly, Peretti welcomes this note of striking newness, explaining that the idea for the colors came from a “very young guy in the atelier.” She says, “I don’t do anything new.”

Her conversation is stream of consciousness, with half-sentences, twists and turns, statements and rebuttals, delivered in a deep, cigarette-honed Italian accent. She describes herself as retired yet still talks regularly with all her ateliers and artisans, in Spain and around the world: glassworkers in Venice, lacquer and basketwork masters in Japan, stone carvers in Hong Kong and more. All are skilled artisans she first sought out during long trips near the beginning of her design career in the mid-’70s, when she used to travel with her Chinese lovebirds in ornamental cages.

In Sant Martí Vell, old stone houses huddle together along steep cobbled alleyways, connected by underground tunnels, some purported to date from the Inquisition. A small church square is adjacent to a converted tax office, which is now Peretti’s main home. Since she first came upon the run-down village in 1969, Peretti has acquired and restored houses, one by one, as they became available. “Sant Martí Vell has been so good for me,” she says. “The work on the houses and roofs here took me away from the focus on my image as a jewelry designer.”


How Elsa Peretti and Tiffany’s Bone Cuff Changed Jewelry Forever

STILL LIFE Elsa Peretti’s early ’80s Thumbprint bowl (top) and Padova magnifying glass (bottom) for Tiffany & Co. A new version of her Bone Cuff (far right), out this year. Tiffany & Co. dish, $295, magnifying glass, $275, and cuff, $7,500, tiffany​.com

It’s curious, considering how Elsa Peretti revolutionized the jewelry world in the 1970s, that today the reclusive, enigmatic and famously fiery designer has such a resistance to newness. She rants over continual requests for “new, new, new,” saying, with a husky flourish, “For me nothing is new. Good line and good form are timeless.

“The 21st century is not my cup of tea. I belong to another century,” says Peretti, speaking by phone from her home in Spain. Long before Covid-induced lockdowns, Peretti had retreated into splendid isolation, with only trusted staff and dogs for company in the tiny medieval hamlet of Sant Martí Vell, outside of Barcelona. It’s here that she finds the strength she needs to work, here that she’s surrounded by the nature that inspires her forms. “I had to isolate,” she says. Peretti was always ahead of her time.

The tempestuous Italian-born model-turned–jewelry designer, creator of some of the most recognizable jewelry designs on the planet—sensual, modern-day amulets including the Open Heart, the Bean Design and the Bone Cuff—turned 80 this year. To celebrate this milestone, and to mark 50 years since the first Bone Cuff, Tiffany & Co., for whom Peretti has been a named designer since 1974, launched new editions of the sculptural, wrist-clenching cuff-bangle in vibrant red, green and blue in May. Out in September are new silver and gold versions with stones like turquoise, tiger’s eye and white, black and green jade. The carved, drop-shaped stones seem to grow organically out of undulating metal. Surprisingly, Peretti welcomes this note of striking newness, explaining that the idea for the colors came from a “very young guy in the atelier.” She says, “I don’t do anything new.”

Her conversation is stream of consciousness, with half-sentences, twists and turns, statements and rebuttals, delivered in a deep, cigarette-honed Italian accent. She describes herself as retired yet still talks regularly with all her ateliers and artisans, in Spain and around the world: glassworkers in Venice, lacquer and basketwork masters in Japan, stone carvers in Hong Kong and more. All are skilled artisans she first sought out during long trips near the beginning of her design career in the mid-’70s, when she used to travel with her Chinese lovebirds in ornamental cages.

In Sant Martí Vell, old stone houses huddle together along steep cobbled alleyways, connected by underground tunnels, some purported to date from the Inquisition. A small church square is adjacent to a converted tax office, which is now Peretti’s main home. Since she first came upon the run-down village in 1969, Peretti has acquired and restored houses, one by one, as they became available. “Sant Martí Vell has been so good for me,” she says. “The work on the houses and roofs here took me away from the focus on my image as a jewelry designer.”


How Elsa Peretti and Tiffany’s Bone Cuff Changed Jewelry Forever

STILL LIFE Elsa Peretti’s early ’80s Thumbprint bowl (top) and Padova magnifying glass (bottom) for Tiffany & Co. A new version of her Bone Cuff (far right), out this year. Tiffany & Co. dish, $295, magnifying glass, $275, and cuff, $7,500, tiffany​.com

It’s curious, considering how Elsa Peretti revolutionized the jewelry world in the 1970s, that today the reclusive, enigmatic and famously fiery designer has such a resistance to newness. She rants over continual requests for “new, new, new,” saying, with a husky flourish, “For me nothing is new. Good line and good form are timeless.

“The 21st century is not my cup of tea. I belong to another century,” says Peretti, speaking by phone from her home in Spain. Long before Covid-induced lockdowns, Peretti had retreated into splendid isolation, with only trusted staff and dogs for company in the tiny medieval hamlet of Sant Martí Vell, outside of Barcelona. It’s here that she finds the strength she needs to work, here that she’s surrounded by the nature that inspires her forms. “I had to isolate,” she says. Peretti was always ahead of her time.

The tempestuous Italian-born model-turned–jewelry designer, creator of some of the most recognizable jewelry designs on the planet—sensual, modern-day amulets including the Open Heart, the Bean Design and the Bone Cuff—turned 80 this year. To celebrate this milestone, and to mark 50 years since the first Bone Cuff, Tiffany & Co., for whom Peretti has been a named designer since 1974, launched new editions of the sculptural, wrist-clenching cuff-bangle in vibrant red, green and blue in May. Out in September are new silver and gold versions with stones like turquoise, tiger’s eye and white, black and green jade. The carved, drop-shaped stones seem to grow organically out of undulating metal. Surprisingly, Peretti welcomes this note of striking newness, explaining that the idea for the colors came from a “very young guy in the atelier.” She says, “I don’t do anything new.”

Her conversation is stream of consciousness, with half-sentences, twists and turns, statements and rebuttals, delivered in a deep, cigarette-honed Italian accent. She describes herself as retired yet still talks regularly with all her ateliers and artisans, in Spain and around the world: glassworkers in Venice, lacquer and basketwork masters in Japan, stone carvers in Hong Kong and more. All are skilled artisans she first sought out during long trips near the beginning of her design career in the mid-’70s, when she used to travel with her Chinese lovebirds in ornamental cages.

In Sant Martí Vell, old stone houses huddle together along steep cobbled alleyways, connected by underground tunnels, some purported to date from the Inquisition. A small church square is adjacent to a converted tax office, which is now Peretti’s main home. Since she first came upon the run-down village in 1969, Peretti has acquired and restored houses, one by one, as they became available. “Sant Martí Vell has been so good for me,” she says. “The work on the houses and roofs here took me away from the focus on my image as a jewelry designer.”


How Elsa Peretti and Tiffany’s Bone Cuff Changed Jewelry Forever

STILL LIFE Elsa Peretti’s early ’80s Thumbprint bowl (top) and Padova magnifying glass (bottom) for Tiffany & Co. A new version of her Bone Cuff (far right), out this year. Tiffany & Co. dish, $295, magnifying glass, $275, and cuff, $7,500, tiffany​.com

It’s curious, considering how Elsa Peretti revolutionized the jewelry world in the 1970s, that today the reclusive, enigmatic and famously fiery designer has such a resistance to newness. She rants over continual requests for “new, new, new,” saying, with a husky flourish, “For me nothing is new. Good line and good form are timeless.

“The 21st century is not my cup of tea. I belong to another century,” says Peretti, speaking by phone from her home in Spain. Long before Covid-induced lockdowns, Peretti had retreated into splendid isolation, with only trusted staff and dogs for company in the tiny medieval hamlet of Sant Martí Vell, outside of Barcelona. It’s here that she finds the strength she needs to work, here that she’s surrounded by the nature that inspires her forms. “I had to isolate,” she says. Peretti was always ahead of her time.

The tempestuous Italian-born model-turned–jewelry designer, creator of some of the most recognizable jewelry designs on the planet—sensual, modern-day amulets including the Open Heart, the Bean Design and the Bone Cuff—turned 80 this year. To celebrate this milestone, and to mark 50 years since the first Bone Cuff, Tiffany & Co., for whom Peretti has been a named designer since 1974, launched new editions of the sculptural, wrist-clenching cuff-bangle in vibrant red, green and blue in May. Out in September are new silver and gold versions with stones like turquoise, tiger’s eye and white, black and green jade. The carved, drop-shaped stones seem to grow organically out of undulating metal. Surprisingly, Peretti welcomes this note of striking newness, explaining that the idea for the colors came from a “very young guy in the atelier.” She says, “I don’t do anything new.”

Her conversation is stream of consciousness, with half-sentences, twists and turns, statements and rebuttals, delivered in a deep, cigarette-honed Italian accent. She describes herself as retired yet still talks regularly with all her ateliers and artisans, in Spain and around the world: glassworkers in Venice, lacquer and basketwork masters in Japan, stone carvers in Hong Kong and more. All are skilled artisans she first sought out during long trips near the beginning of her design career in the mid-’70s, when she used to travel with her Chinese lovebirds in ornamental cages.

In Sant Martí Vell, old stone houses huddle together along steep cobbled alleyways, connected by underground tunnels, some purported to date from the Inquisition. A small church square is adjacent to a converted tax office, which is now Peretti’s main home. Since she first came upon the run-down village in 1969, Peretti has acquired and restored houses, one by one, as they became available. “Sant Martí Vell has been so good for me,” she says. “The work on the houses and roofs here took me away from the focus on my image as a jewelry designer.”


Watch the video: Cuff Introduction Video - Smart Jewellery (June 2022).


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