Traditional recipes

Go Bananas: Your Easiest Ice Cream Recipe Ever

Go Bananas: Your Easiest Ice Cream Recipe Ever

You know the moment where you’re dying for something sweet but you know that you shouldn’t go for the treat but you really want it and then there is just this internal debate that is on the same magnitude as choosing between Netflix and school work? (You know that you made the best decision. House of Cards was definitely worth it.) Yeah.

Now let me tell you a little secret: The best of both worlds absolutely exists.

Don’t believe me? Try the recipe.

Photo by Katherine Carroll

Super Easy Ice Cream Recipe

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Sit Time: 2 hours
Total Time: 2 hours 5 minutes

Servings: 3 half-cup servings

Ingredients:
3 ripe bananas
3 tablespoons milk (You can make this Vegan-style with almond or soy milk)
Chocolate chips

Directions:

Photo by Katherine Carroll

1. Slice bananas into thin slivers.

Photo by Katherine Carroll

2. Put banana slices on a plate or in a plastic container. Freeze for two hours.

Photo by Katherine Carroll

3. After two hours, take the frozen banana slices out of the freezer, and put in a blender. Add milk and desired amount chocolate chips.

Photo by Katherine Carroll

4. Blend until smooth and creamy.*

Photo by Katherine Carroll

5. Enjoy your new favorite treat and another round of Netflix.

*NOTE: You can also make this recipe without a blender. You just have to mush the frozen bananas with a spoon or fork. Your ice cream will not be at creamy, but hey who doesn’t love a textured ice cream.

View the original post, Go Bananas: Your Easiest Ice Cream Recipe Ever, on Spoon University.

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The Only Ice Cream Recipe You’ll Ever Need

When I was 17, I had a summer job making ice cream at Peter’s on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn. It was a cinch. You poured the milky contents of a container labeled “base” into the machine, added your flavorings (chocolate, vanilla, kiwi or what have you) and turned the switch.

I discovered that ice cream making (and the critical task of frequently tasting it) was one of the most enjoyable, creative things a person could get paid to do on a sultry day. The possible flavor combinations are infinite, and endlessly satisfying. And while my guanabana-chocolate chunk was not as successful as my mocha-caramel-almond, it was just as thrilling to mix.

Although I know a lot more about making ice cream now than I did then, the fundamental lesson is the same. As long as you start with a good ice cream base and add excellent ingredients, you can make any flavor in the universe: almond, basil, lime. It’s also going to taste a whole lot better than any you can buy.

There are many kinds of ice cream bases, ranging from the simplest mix of cream and sugar to more elaborate combinations including xanthan or guar gum, corn syrup and milk powder.


The Only Ice Cream Recipe You’ll Ever Need

When I was 17, I had a summer job making ice cream at Peter’s on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn. It was a cinch. You poured the milky contents of a container labeled “base” into the machine, added your flavorings (chocolate, vanilla, kiwi or what have you) and turned the switch.

I discovered that ice cream making (and the critical task of frequently tasting it) was one of the most enjoyable, creative things a person could get paid to do on a sultry day. The possible flavor combinations are infinite, and endlessly satisfying. And while my guanabana-chocolate chunk was not as successful as my mocha-caramel-almond, it was just as thrilling to mix.

Although I know a lot more about making ice cream now than I did then, the fundamental lesson is the same. As long as you start with a good ice cream base and add excellent ingredients, you can make any flavor in the universe: almond, basil, lime. It’s also going to taste a whole lot better than any you can buy.

There are many kinds of ice cream bases, ranging from the simplest mix of cream and sugar to more elaborate combinations including xanthan or guar gum, corn syrup and milk powder.


The Only Ice Cream Recipe You’ll Ever Need

When I was 17, I had a summer job making ice cream at Peter’s on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn. It was a cinch. You poured the milky contents of a container labeled “base” into the machine, added your flavorings (chocolate, vanilla, kiwi or what have you) and turned the switch.

I discovered that ice cream making (and the critical task of frequently tasting it) was one of the most enjoyable, creative things a person could get paid to do on a sultry day. The possible flavor combinations are infinite, and endlessly satisfying. And while my guanabana-chocolate chunk was not as successful as my mocha-caramel-almond, it was just as thrilling to mix.

Although I know a lot more about making ice cream now than I did then, the fundamental lesson is the same. As long as you start with a good ice cream base and add excellent ingredients, you can make any flavor in the universe: almond, basil, lime. It’s also going to taste a whole lot better than any you can buy.

There are many kinds of ice cream bases, ranging from the simplest mix of cream and sugar to more elaborate combinations including xanthan or guar gum, corn syrup and milk powder.


The Only Ice Cream Recipe You’ll Ever Need

When I was 17, I had a summer job making ice cream at Peter’s on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn. It was a cinch. You poured the milky contents of a container labeled “base” into the machine, added your flavorings (chocolate, vanilla, kiwi or what have you) and turned the switch.

I discovered that ice cream making (and the critical task of frequently tasting it) was one of the most enjoyable, creative things a person could get paid to do on a sultry day. The possible flavor combinations are infinite, and endlessly satisfying. And while my guanabana-chocolate chunk was not as successful as my mocha-caramel-almond, it was just as thrilling to mix.

Although I know a lot more about making ice cream now than I did then, the fundamental lesson is the same. As long as you start with a good ice cream base and add excellent ingredients, you can make any flavor in the universe: almond, basil, lime. It’s also going to taste a whole lot better than any you can buy.

There are many kinds of ice cream bases, ranging from the simplest mix of cream and sugar to more elaborate combinations including xanthan or guar gum, corn syrup and milk powder.


The Only Ice Cream Recipe You’ll Ever Need

When I was 17, I had a summer job making ice cream at Peter’s on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn. It was a cinch. You poured the milky contents of a container labeled “base” into the machine, added your flavorings (chocolate, vanilla, kiwi or what have you) and turned the switch.

I discovered that ice cream making (and the critical task of frequently tasting it) was one of the most enjoyable, creative things a person could get paid to do on a sultry day. The possible flavor combinations are infinite, and endlessly satisfying. And while my guanabana-chocolate chunk was not as successful as my mocha-caramel-almond, it was just as thrilling to mix.

Although I know a lot more about making ice cream now than I did then, the fundamental lesson is the same. As long as you start with a good ice cream base and add excellent ingredients, you can make any flavor in the universe: almond, basil, lime. It’s also going to taste a whole lot better than any you can buy.

There are many kinds of ice cream bases, ranging from the simplest mix of cream and sugar to more elaborate combinations including xanthan or guar gum, corn syrup and milk powder.


The Only Ice Cream Recipe You’ll Ever Need

When I was 17, I had a summer job making ice cream at Peter’s on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn. It was a cinch. You poured the milky contents of a container labeled “base” into the machine, added your flavorings (chocolate, vanilla, kiwi or what have you) and turned the switch.

I discovered that ice cream making (and the critical task of frequently tasting it) was one of the most enjoyable, creative things a person could get paid to do on a sultry day. The possible flavor combinations are infinite, and endlessly satisfying. And while my guanabana-chocolate chunk was not as successful as my mocha-caramel-almond, it was just as thrilling to mix.

Although I know a lot more about making ice cream now than I did then, the fundamental lesson is the same. As long as you start with a good ice cream base and add excellent ingredients, you can make any flavor in the universe: almond, basil, lime. It’s also going to taste a whole lot better than any you can buy.

There are many kinds of ice cream bases, ranging from the simplest mix of cream and sugar to more elaborate combinations including xanthan or guar gum, corn syrup and milk powder.


The Only Ice Cream Recipe You’ll Ever Need

When I was 17, I had a summer job making ice cream at Peter’s on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn. It was a cinch. You poured the milky contents of a container labeled “base” into the machine, added your flavorings (chocolate, vanilla, kiwi or what have you) and turned the switch.

I discovered that ice cream making (and the critical task of frequently tasting it) was one of the most enjoyable, creative things a person could get paid to do on a sultry day. The possible flavor combinations are infinite, and endlessly satisfying. And while my guanabana-chocolate chunk was not as successful as my mocha-caramel-almond, it was just as thrilling to mix.

Although I know a lot more about making ice cream now than I did then, the fundamental lesson is the same. As long as you start with a good ice cream base and add excellent ingredients, you can make any flavor in the universe: almond, basil, lime. It’s also going to taste a whole lot better than any you can buy.

There are many kinds of ice cream bases, ranging from the simplest mix of cream and sugar to more elaborate combinations including xanthan or guar gum, corn syrup and milk powder.


The Only Ice Cream Recipe You’ll Ever Need

When I was 17, I had a summer job making ice cream at Peter’s on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn. It was a cinch. You poured the milky contents of a container labeled “base” into the machine, added your flavorings (chocolate, vanilla, kiwi or what have you) and turned the switch.

I discovered that ice cream making (and the critical task of frequently tasting it) was one of the most enjoyable, creative things a person could get paid to do on a sultry day. The possible flavor combinations are infinite, and endlessly satisfying. And while my guanabana-chocolate chunk was not as successful as my mocha-caramel-almond, it was just as thrilling to mix.

Although I know a lot more about making ice cream now than I did then, the fundamental lesson is the same. As long as you start with a good ice cream base and add excellent ingredients, you can make any flavor in the universe: almond, basil, lime. It’s also going to taste a whole lot better than any you can buy.

There are many kinds of ice cream bases, ranging from the simplest mix of cream and sugar to more elaborate combinations including xanthan or guar gum, corn syrup and milk powder.


The Only Ice Cream Recipe You’ll Ever Need

When I was 17, I had a summer job making ice cream at Peter’s on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn. It was a cinch. You poured the milky contents of a container labeled “base” into the machine, added your flavorings (chocolate, vanilla, kiwi or what have you) and turned the switch.

I discovered that ice cream making (and the critical task of frequently tasting it) was one of the most enjoyable, creative things a person could get paid to do on a sultry day. The possible flavor combinations are infinite, and endlessly satisfying. And while my guanabana-chocolate chunk was not as successful as my mocha-caramel-almond, it was just as thrilling to mix.

Although I know a lot more about making ice cream now than I did then, the fundamental lesson is the same. As long as you start with a good ice cream base and add excellent ingredients, you can make any flavor in the universe: almond, basil, lime. It’s also going to taste a whole lot better than any you can buy.

There are many kinds of ice cream bases, ranging from the simplest mix of cream and sugar to more elaborate combinations including xanthan or guar gum, corn syrup and milk powder.


The Only Ice Cream Recipe You’ll Ever Need

When I was 17, I had a summer job making ice cream at Peter’s on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn. It was a cinch. You poured the milky contents of a container labeled “base” into the machine, added your flavorings (chocolate, vanilla, kiwi or what have you) and turned the switch.

I discovered that ice cream making (and the critical task of frequently tasting it) was one of the most enjoyable, creative things a person could get paid to do on a sultry day. The possible flavor combinations are infinite, and endlessly satisfying. And while my guanabana-chocolate chunk was not as successful as my mocha-caramel-almond, it was just as thrilling to mix.

Although I know a lot more about making ice cream now than I did then, the fundamental lesson is the same. As long as you start with a good ice cream base and add excellent ingredients, you can make any flavor in the universe: almond, basil, lime. It’s also going to taste a whole lot better than any you can buy.

There are many kinds of ice cream bases, ranging from the simplest mix of cream and sugar to more elaborate combinations including xanthan or guar gum, corn syrup and milk powder.


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