Traditional recipes

7 New Chicago Restaurants

7 New Chicago Restaurants

Cold weather has come to Chicago all too soon, but that hasn’t kept the restaurant scene from blooming. Here are some standout restaurants opening that are worth checking out this autumn.

Now Open:
Just off Randolph Street, Parlor Pizza Bar offers a fun, casual choice among the fancier establishments on Restaurant Row. Once an auto repair shop, the building has been transformed into a cozy and expansive eatery. Grab a seat at by the kitchen to watch the chefs firsthand as they prepare unique pies like the Hawaii Pie-O with coconut cheese.

Esteemed chef Paul Kahan’s newest place, Dove’s Luncheonette, has opened just next door to his immensely popular Big Star in Wicker Park. Fashioned like an old-school diner, Dove’s serves up flavorful Tex-Mex dishes including a torta, chile relleno, and ceviche.

Another food truck has made the move to brick-and-mortar. The owners of the popular Pierogi Wagon truck have opened Polak Eatery in the Humboldt Park neighborhood. This café crafts rustic Polish dishes with a modern touch. Of course, pierogi are a menu highlight, with more expansive options in the works.

This highly praised fast casual burger shop Umami Burger has finally made its way to the Windy City. Their first location is open in Wicker Park and brings plenty of delectable “fifth taste” options. The Calabrese is their Chicago signature burger: a Calabrese sausage patty topped with truffle cheese, truffle aioli, and giardinara.

Coming Soon:
Charlatan, by the guys behind Three Aces, has been long awaited in the West Town neighborhood. The planned menu revolves around locally sourced, modern Italian fare. The restaurant is aiming for an October opening.

Massive Japanese restaurant Momotaro will be opening in mid-October in the West Loop neighborhood. The menu is inspired by the food found in the daily lives of the Japanese people and will offer small plates, noodle dishes, sushi, robata, and more.

Also in West Loop, Formento’s will offer Italian-American family-style food., with a menu focusing on rich flavors and traditional recipes, paired with a carefully crafted wine and cocktail list. Formento’s is due to open before winter.


Where to Eat Cajun and Creole Food in Chicago

Chicago is obviously far away from the Big Easy in many ways besides geography. Traveling is potentially dangerous proposition due to the pandemic, but Chicagoans can celebrate New Orleans’ famous food with some tasty Cajun and Creole fare locally all year round. Satisfy those gumbo, po' boy, shrimp and grits, and even Hurricane cravings with a hearty southern feast and drinks.

Some of the area’s strongest Cajun and Creole contenders, Buddy Guy’s Legends and Maple Tree Inn, have gone into hibernation, entries include virtual restaurants, food trucks, and robust takeout operations. Laissez les bons temps rouler.

The pandemic continues to alter the dining landscape, stalwarts like Maple Tree Inn remain in hibernation. As of February 16, Chicago restaurants are permitted to serve customers indoors with a 40 percent maximum capacity per room, or 50 people — whichever is fewer. At the same time, despite winter weather, a number of Chicago restaurants continue to offer outdoor seating. Regardless, the state requires reservations for indoor and outdoor dining. The level of service offered is indicated on each map point. However, this should not be taken as an endorsement for dining in, as there are still safety concerns. For updated information on coronavirus cases in your area, please visit the city of Chicago’s COVID-19 dashboard. Studies indicate that there is a lower exposure risk when outdoors, but the level of risk involved with patio dining is contingent on restaurants following strict social distancing and other safety guidelines.


Where to Eat Cajun and Creole Food in Chicago

Chicago is obviously far away from the Big Easy in many ways besides geography. Traveling is potentially dangerous proposition due to the pandemic, but Chicagoans can celebrate New Orleans’ famous food with some tasty Cajun and Creole fare locally all year round. Satisfy those gumbo, po' boy, shrimp and grits, and even Hurricane cravings with a hearty southern feast and drinks.

Some of the area’s strongest Cajun and Creole contenders, Buddy Guy’s Legends and Maple Tree Inn, have gone into hibernation, entries include virtual restaurants, food trucks, and robust takeout operations. Laissez les bons temps rouler.

The pandemic continues to alter the dining landscape, stalwarts like Maple Tree Inn remain in hibernation. As of February 16, Chicago restaurants are permitted to serve customers indoors with a 40 percent maximum capacity per room, or 50 people — whichever is fewer. At the same time, despite winter weather, a number of Chicago restaurants continue to offer outdoor seating. Regardless, the state requires reservations for indoor and outdoor dining. The level of service offered is indicated on each map point. However, this should not be taken as an endorsement for dining in, as there are still safety concerns. For updated information on coronavirus cases in your area, please visit the city of Chicago’s COVID-19 dashboard. Studies indicate that there is a lower exposure risk when outdoors, but the level of risk involved with patio dining is contingent on restaurants following strict social distancing and other safety guidelines.


Where to Eat Cajun and Creole Food in Chicago

Chicago is obviously far away from the Big Easy in many ways besides geography. Traveling is potentially dangerous proposition due to the pandemic, but Chicagoans can celebrate New Orleans’ famous food with some tasty Cajun and Creole fare locally all year round. Satisfy those gumbo, po' boy, shrimp and grits, and even Hurricane cravings with a hearty southern feast and drinks.

Some of the area’s strongest Cajun and Creole contenders, Buddy Guy’s Legends and Maple Tree Inn, have gone into hibernation, entries include virtual restaurants, food trucks, and robust takeout operations. Laissez les bons temps rouler.

The pandemic continues to alter the dining landscape, stalwarts like Maple Tree Inn remain in hibernation. As of February 16, Chicago restaurants are permitted to serve customers indoors with a 40 percent maximum capacity per room, or 50 people — whichever is fewer. At the same time, despite winter weather, a number of Chicago restaurants continue to offer outdoor seating. Regardless, the state requires reservations for indoor and outdoor dining. The level of service offered is indicated on each map point. However, this should not be taken as an endorsement for dining in, as there are still safety concerns. For updated information on coronavirus cases in your area, please visit the city of Chicago’s COVID-19 dashboard. Studies indicate that there is a lower exposure risk when outdoors, but the level of risk involved with patio dining is contingent on restaurants following strict social distancing and other safety guidelines.


Where to Eat Cajun and Creole Food in Chicago

Chicago is obviously far away from the Big Easy in many ways besides geography. Traveling is potentially dangerous proposition due to the pandemic, but Chicagoans can celebrate New Orleans’ famous food with some tasty Cajun and Creole fare locally all year round. Satisfy those gumbo, po' boy, shrimp and grits, and even Hurricane cravings with a hearty southern feast and drinks.

Some of the area’s strongest Cajun and Creole contenders, Buddy Guy’s Legends and Maple Tree Inn, have gone into hibernation, entries include virtual restaurants, food trucks, and robust takeout operations. Laissez les bons temps rouler.

The pandemic continues to alter the dining landscape, stalwarts like Maple Tree Inn remain in hibernation. As of February 16, Chicago restaurants are permitted to serve customers indoors with a 40 percent maximum capacity per room, or 50 people — whichever is fewer. At the same time, despite winter weather, a number of Chicago restaurants continue to offer outdoor seating. Regardless, the state requires reservations for indoor and outdoor dining. The level of service offered is indicated on each map point. However, this should not be taken as an endorsement for dining in, as there are still safety concerns. For updated information on coronavirus cases in your area, please visit the city of Chicago’s COVID-19 dashboard. Studies indicate that there is a lower exposure risk when outdoors, but the level of risk involved with patio dining is contingent on restaurants following strict social distancing and other safety guidelines.


Where to Eat Cajun and Creole Food in Chicago

Chicago is obviously far away from the Big Easy in many ways besides geography. Traveling is potentially dangerous proposition due to the pandemic, but Chicagoans can celebrate New Orleans’ famous food with some tasty Cajun and Creole fare locally all year round. Satisfy those gumbo, po' boy, shrimp and grits, and even Hurricane cravings with a hearty southern feast and drinks.

Some of the area’s strongest Cajun and Creole contenders, Buddy Guy’s Legends and Maple Tree Inn, have gone into hibernation, entries include virtual restaurants, food trucks, and robust takeout operations. Laissez les bons temps rouler.

The pandemic continues to alter the dining landscape, stalwarts like Maple Tree Inn remain in hibernation. As of February 16, Chicago restaurants are permitted to serve customers indoors with a 40 percent maximum capacity per room, or 50 people — whichever is fewer. At the same time, despite winter weather, a number of Chicago restaurants continue to offer outdoor seating. Regardless, the state requires reservations for indoor and outdoor dining. The level of service offered is indicated on each map point. However, this should not be taken as an endorsement for dining in, as there are still safety concerns. For updated information on coronavirus cases in your area, please visit the city of Chicago’s COVID-19 dashboard. Studies indicate that there is a lower exposure risk when outdoors, but the level of risk involved with patio dining is contingent on restaurants following strict social distancing and other safety guidelines.


Where to Eat Cajun and Creole Food in Chicago

Chicago is obviously far away from the Big Easy in many ways besides geography. Traveling is potentially dangerous proposition due to the pandemic, but Chicagoans can celebrate New Orleans’ famous food with some tasty Cajun and Creole fare locally all year round. Satisfy those gumbo, po' boy, shrimp and grits, and even Hurricane cravings with a hearty southern feast and drinks.

Some of the area’s strongest Cajun and Creole contenders, Buddy Guy’s Legends and Maple Tree Inn, have gone into hibernation, entries include virtual restaurants, food trucks, and robust takeout operations. Laissez les bons temps rouler.

The pandemic continues to alter the dining landscape, stalwarts like Maple Tree Inn remain in hibernation. As of February 16, Chicago restaurants are permitted to serve customers indoors with a 40 percent maximum capacity per room, or 50 people — whichever is fewer. At the same time, despite winter weather, a number of Chicago restaurants continue to offer outdoor seating. Regardless, the state requires reservations for indoor and outdoor dining. The level of service offered is indicated on each map point. However, this should not be taken as an endorsement for dining in, as there are still safety concerns. For updated information on coronavirus cases in your area, please visit the city of Chicago’s COVID-19 dashboard. Studies indicate that there is a lower exposure risk when outdoors, but the level of risk involved with patio dining is contingent on restaurants following strict social distancing and other safety guidelines.


Where to Eat Cajun and Creole Food in Chicago

Chicago is obviously far away from the Big Easy in many ways besides geography. Traveling is potentially dangerous proposition due to the pandemic, but Chicagoans can celebrate New Orleans’ famous food with some tasty Cajun and Creole fare locally all year round. Satisfy those gumbo, po' boy, shrimp and grits, and even Hurricane cravings with a hearty southern feast and drinks.

Some of the area’s strongest Cajun and Creole contenders, Buddy Guy’s Legends and Maple Tree Inn, have gone into hibernation, entries include virtual restaurants, food trucks, and robust takeout operations. Laissez les bons temps rouler.

The pandemic continues to alter the dining landscape, stalwarts like Maple Tree Inn remain in hibernation. As of February 16, Chicago restaurants are permitted to serve customers indoors with a 40 percent maximum capacity per room, or 50 people — whichever is fewer. At the same time, despite winter weather, a number of Chicago restaurants continue to offer outdoor seating. Regardless, the state requires reservations for indoor and outdoor dining. The level of service offered is indicated on each map point. However, this should not be taken as an endorsement for dining in, as there are still safety concerns. For updated information on coronavirus cases in your area, please visit the city of Chicago’s COVID-19 dashboard. Studies indicate that there is a lower exposure risk when outdoors, but the level of risk involved with patio dining is contingent on restaurants following strict social distancing and other safety guidelines.


Where to Eat Cajun and Creole Food in Chicago

Chicago is obviously far away from the Big Easy in many ways besides geography. Traveling is potentially dangerous proposition due to the pandemic, but Chicagoans can celebrate New Orleans’ famous food with some tasty Cajun and Creole fare locally all year round. Satisfy those gumbo, po' boy, shrimp and grits, and even Hurricane cravings with a hearty southern feast and drinks.

Some of the area’s strongest Cajun and Creole contenders, Buddy Guy’s Legends and Maple Tree Inn, have gone into hibernation, entries include virtual restaurants, food trucks, and robust takeout operations. Laissez les bons temps rouler.

The pandemic continues to alter the dining landscape, stalwarts like Maple Tree Inn remain in hibernation. As of February 16, Chicago restaurants are permitted to serve customers indoors with a 40 percent maximum capacity per room, or 50 people — whichever is fewer. At the same time, despite winter weather, a number of Chicago restaurants continue to offer outdoor seating. Regardless, the state requires reservations for indoor and outdoor dining. The level of service offered is indicated on each map point. However, this should not be taken as an endorsement for dining in, as there are still safety concerns. For updated information on coronavirus cases in your area, please visit the city of Chicago’s COVID-19 dashboard. Studies indicate that there is a lower exposure risk when outdoors, but the level of risk involved with patio dining is contingent on restaurants following strict social distancing and other safety guidelines.


Where to Eat Cajun and Creole Food in Chicago

Chicago is obviously far away from the Big Easy in many ways besides geography. Traveling is potentially dangerous proposition due to the pandemic, but Chicagoans can celebrate New Orleans’ famous food with some tasty Cajun and Creole fare locally all year round. Satisfy those gumbo, po' boy, shrimp and grits, and even Hurricane cravings with a hearty southern feast and drinks.

Some of the area’s strongest Cajun and Creole contenders, Buddy Guy’s Legends and Maple Tree Inn, have gone into hibernation, entries include virtual restaurants, food trucks, and robust takeout operations. Laissez les bons temps rouler.

The pandemic continues to alter the dining landscape, stalwarts like Maple Tree Inn remain in hibernation. As of February 16, Chicago restaurants are permitted to serve customers indoors with a 40 percent maximum capacity per room, or 50 people — whichever is fewer. At the same time, despite winter weather, a number of Chicago restaurants continue to offer outdoor seating. Regardless, the state requires reservations for indoor and outdoor dining. The level of service offered is indicated on each map point. However, this should not be taken as an endorsement for dining in, as there are still safety concerns. For updated information on coronavirus cases in your area, please visit the city of Chicago’s COVID-19 dashboard. Studies indicate that there is a lower exposure risk when outdoors, but the level of risk involved with patio dining is contingent on restaurants following strict social distancing and other safety guidelines.


Where to Eat Cajun and Creole Food in Chicago

Chicago is obviously far away from the Big Easy in many ways besides geography. Traveling is potentially dangerous proposition due to the pandemic, but Chicagoans can celebrate New Orleans’ famous food with some tasty Cajun and Creole fare locally all year round. Satisfy those gumbo, po' boy, shrimp and grits, and even Hurricane cravings with a hearty southern feast and drinks.

Some of the area’s strongest Cajun and Creole contenders, Buddy Guy’s Legends and Maple Tree Inn, have gone into hibernation, entries include virtual restaurants, food trucks, and robust takeout operations. Laissez les bons temps rouler.

The pandemic continues to alter the dining landscape, stalwarts like Maple Tree Inn remain in hibernation. As of February 16, Chicago restaurants are permitted to serve customers indoors with a 40 percent maximum capacity per room, or 50 people — whichever is fewer. At the same time, despite winter weather, a number of Chicago restaurants continue to offer outdoor seating. Regardless, the state requires reservations for indoor and outdoor dining. The level of service offered is indicated on each map point. However, this should not be taken as an endorsement for dining in, as there are still safety concerns. For updated information on coronavirus cases in your area, please visit the city of Chicago’s COVID-19 dashboard. Studies indicate that there is a lower exposure risk when outdoors, but the level of risk involved with patio dining is contingent on restaurants following strict social distancing and other safety guidelines.


Watch the video: The Trial of the Chicago 7. Official Trailer. Netflix Film (December 2021).